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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 5: graduation from the United States Military Academy, 1854; brevet Second Lieutenant in Ordnance Department, 1855-56 (search)
ng ordnance officer available to fill his place; so I was selected and sent to Augusta to relieve him. It was a favor for a second lieutenant to have an independebrief sermon, his gratitude reached the highest water mark. I did not stay at Augusta long enough for a second trial of Independence Day. It was while on duty at friends that I had had when preparing for college was Charles H. Mulliken, of Augusta. He was now married and had a small family. He and I renewed our intimacy and our families enjoyed the social life of Augusta together. It was very much to me personally then and for many years afterwards to have such a friend. He was healand always unselfishly devoted to my best interests. We sometimes, while in Augusta, attended the Episcopal church. Rev. Mr. Armitage, then a young man, made a stcient minister, who subsequently became the Bishop of Ohio. It was while at Augusta that I spent much of my leisure in training horses. I had brought on with me
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
g I wrote to Governor Washburn, of Maine, and offered my services. His reply was unfavorable. Commissioned officers of regiments were all to be elected by the men. He, himself, had no power to choose. But the fact of the offer became known at Augusta. Not long afterwards, about the middle of May, a dispatch came to me from the Hon. James G. Blaine, then the youthful Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives. It read: Will you, if elected, accept the colonelcy of the Kennebec Regiment affirmative answer. The news of my probable election and the rapid call for troops from Washington, as published in the press, decided me to anticipate official notification and so, having obtained a seven days leave, I proposed to set out for Augusta. As soon, however, as it was plain to me that our grand old Government would need my services, I gave up every other plan except as to the best way for me to contribute to the saving of her life. This decision I believed, as God has His plan
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 8: Colonel of the Third Maine regiment; departure for the front (search)
there, caught the 7.30 train on the Boston & Maine, and sped off to arrive at Augusta before five the same afternoon. Here I received Mr. Blaine's reply as follows: Augusta, 29th of May, 1861. My Dear Howard: You were chosen to the command of the Third Regiment yesterday and public opinion is entirely unanimous in favor oe among the war governors of his time. The next morning after my arrival in Augusta, the governor was early in his office at the State House. He had hardly throwignated had had no experience. Some essential drilling was all I attempted at Augusta, just enough to enable me to move the regiment in a body and to load and fire trees and the luxurious lilacs were in full bloom; the maples in every part of Augusta were thick with leaves as rich and charming as fresh green could make them. Vorms rushed down the slopes to the trains. Slowly these trains moved out of Augusta. Heads were thrust out of car windows; and the tops of railcoaches were cover
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 10: camping in Washington; in command of a brigade (search)
seems to have been a disastrous fight under incompetent leaders. But now in the retrospect one hardly casts blame. Experience and the habit of working together would have hindered the panic at the junction. The famous Magruder and D. H. Hill were on the other side in this combat. The victory then gave them joy and confidence-extravagant, indeed, but thus it was in both armies early in the war. Modesty and mutual respect appeared in reports and dispatches only later. Before leaving Augusta Mr. Blaine and I were talking of the army to be organized from the volunteers. I-e remarked: You, Howard, will be the first brigadier from Maine. Of course the proposition to me, accustomed only to wrinkled captains and white-headed field officers, appeared visionary. Later, July 4th, I answered another friend who made the same suggestion: I am as high as I desire. What could I effect in a higher position I do not think there is any likelihood at present of taking me from my regiment.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 33: battle of Smyrna camp ground; crossing the Chattahoochee; General Johnston relieved from command (search)
this time Sherman relieved all suspense in the langour of hot weather by ordering us forward and then said: A week's work after crossing the Chattahoochee should determine the first object aimed at; viz., the possession of the Atlanta and Augusta road east of Decatur, Ga., or of Atlanta itself. Having the same Fourth Corps under Thomas I was already near the middle of our concave line: Palmer the rightmost, Hooker next, and I next, then Schofield, then McPherson. Stoneman was back by, and had already made good a crossing of the south fork of the Peach Tree Creek. McPherson, having to make twice the march of Thomas's center, had gone on too rapidly for Hood's calculations. He had already in long gaps broken the railroad to Augusta, and was so swiftly approaching Atlanta from the east that Hood had to stretch his lines farther around the great city to the east and south, thus thinning his lines before Thomas. As my orders appeared a little confusing, I rode back at dayl
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 34: battle of Peach Tree Creek (search)
eft of the gap that existed between Wood and Newton, constituted this day a maneuvering army by itself. Sherman, with Schofield, near the center, here took direct cognizance, as far as he could, of all that was going on. Sherman, knowing Hood's characteristics, felt that he would attack him and believed that he would make his first offensive effort against McPherson or Schofield, because the movements of these commanders were aimed threateningly against all his communications. Already the Augusta road was cut by them in several places and miles of it destroyed. Wheeler, with Confederate cavalry, opposite McPherson, being driven by artillery, was slowly falling back toward Atlanta. Hood, much troubled by McPherson's steady approach, directed Wheeler in his own blunt way to fight harder, and assured him that G. W. Smith with his troops was behind him, and would vigorously support his resistance. McPherson's left division, farthest south, drove Wheeler's cavalry constantly backw