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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
, a Presbyterian pastor, preached his funeral sermon. Baker's brother and son were present. One of his officers fell in a swoon during the exercises. To the cemetery, a distance of three miles, I rode with General Denver, of California. Senator Henry Wilson was one of the pallbearers; this occasion afforded me my first introduction to him. An immense unsympathetic crowd followed to see the military procession. Nobody evinced sorrow-very few even raised their hats as we passed. The Washingl motley brood of followers-such was the mixed multitude which followed the noble and generous Baker without emotion to his tomb. The wail in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania over the excessive and bootless losses at Ball's Bluff followed. To Senator Wilson and myself that funeral was deeply saddening. The evening shadows were thickening as we placed Baker in his last resting place. Had General Stone's plans leading to this battle succeeded, he would have been praised for his energy and ente
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 25: the battle of Gettysburg; the second and third day (search)
osed. But it happened that 7 A. M. was too late. In a letter of July 14th, dated at Funkstown, Md., where we had abutted against Lee's intrenched position till he effected a crossing by the deep ford and by a hastily constructed rickety bridge of boats, I wrote just after the works were emptied of his troops: The enemy has got away from us again and gone back to the Potomac, having left a strongly fortified position. We do not know yet whether the Confederates have all crossed. ... Senator Wilson and Vice-President Hamlin visited us while here. I remember meeting them in the belfry of a large church on July 13th, in Funkstown, from which we could see what appeared to be Lee's extreme left flank. The letter further says: Captain Harry M. Stinsongood, true, and faithful and brave as ever — has just reported that he had been in the enemy's evacuated works. We hastened on that morning, after we found Lee's lines empty, to Williamsport. En route I reproached an elderly, gray-h