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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
of demand for well-: trained colored youth, and no diminution of interest on the part of the descendants of the freedmen in seeking for that knowledge which will fit them for the common duties of life. To show how great things spring from small in this matter, notice the work of a single graduate of Hampton: Booker T. Washington. He graduated in the class of 1875; he taught school three terms in West Virginia; he took further studies at Wayland Seminary, Washington, D. C., and returning in 1880 to Hampton he taught Indians till 1881; then, recommended by General Armstrong to found a State normal school at Tuskegee, Ala., he was appointed principal. He commenced the school with thirty pupils in a colored church, with an outfit of $2,000 and nothing besides. Washington wrote in 1896: Beginning July 4, 1881, without a dollar except the annual appropriation ($2,000), during the thirteen years there has come into our treasury $491,955.42 in cash from all sources. During the thirteen
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 64: superintendent of the United States military Academy; commanding Department of the Platte, Omaha, Neb. (search)
ntention. A court of inquiry had been held at West Point the result of which had not been at all satisfactory. The incident had caused a great deal of public comment in the newspapers, and sharp excitement for and against the colored cadet. President Hayes had an idea that I was the proper man to settle such a case. For other reasons also the President wished to assign me to command the Military Academy. I knew nothing of these reasons when suddenly I received orders, near the close of 1880, to proceed to West Point, and as superintendent of the Military Academy take command there. When we reached Chicago the cold was intense. The thermometer registered thirty degrees below zero. A colored man unknown to me, who was driving the carriage from the station to the hotel, seized a buffalo coat and put it over my shoulders, but my son John, who was then a lad of fourteen, was not sufficiently covered and took a severe cold which in the end resulted in an attack of pneumonia that