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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 33 9 Browse Search
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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 63: in the Northwest, among the Indians; trip to Alaska; life in Portland, Ore.; 1874 to 1881 (search)
s journey I have given a detailed account in my book on Indians. I In both the Nez Perces and Bannock wars Second Lieutenant Guy Howard's gallant conduct was conspicuous. On August 20, 1877, at Camas Meadows, Ida., the Indians made a night attact night we noticed that there was but little space from twilight to dawn, not more than an hour. It was difficult for Mrs. Howard to persuade the children to go to bed when the sun was shining. After our return, October, 1875, I received word thg me: What is that, general I answered: A brewery, sir. Then he said: I think, Julia, that must have been put up on Howard's account; it wasn't here in my day! During the reception that evening Governor Ferry, of Washington Territory, in an my feet since I went abroad till I can manage to say a few words. Everybody, including General and Mrs. Grant, gave Mrs. Howard special credit for the cheerful, simple, and satisfactory entertainment of the evening. It is sometimes thought tha
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 67: France and Germany; Convention of young men's Christian Association, Berlin, 1884 (search)
rocession. One lady who stood near me touched me on the arm and said to me in fairly good English: You are an American officer, I am told. I said, Yes, I am General Howard of the American army. Then, she asked, do you know my brother in the United States? I smiled as I thought of the vast expanse of the United States and answehe location of ancient castles was pointed out. Landing at Bingen, I went to Paris and was delighted to find at my hotel waiting for me, my son and aid, Lieutenant Guy Howard, and his wife. Later Miss Clara Greble came to us to remain with Mrs. Guy Howard that my son might accompany me to the French maneuvers, which were to takg at Bingen, I went to Paris and was delighted to find at my hotel waiting for me, my son and aid, Lieutenant Guy Howard, and his wife. Later Miss Clara Greble came to us to remain with Mrs. Guy Howard that my son might accompany me to the French maneuvers, which were to take place in southwestern France, near the Spanish border.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 68: French army maneuvers, 1884; promotion to Major General, United States army, San Francisco 1886-88 (search)
Chapter 68: French army maneuvers, 1884; promotion to Major General, United States army, San Francisco 1886-88 In Paris, September 4, 1884, Lieutenant John P. Wisser, United States Army, who came to me by direction of our War Department, Captain Guy Howard, and myself joined the French officers who were designated to guide us during the maneuvers of the Seventeenth Corps d'arm~e in the south of France. A genial young officer, Colonel Rigault, had special charge of us because we were delegateople in a reception given by the noble marquis and his family; there were present distinguished civilians and well-known naval officers of high rank, and I was impressed by their attainments and high-toned gentility. The next day, my son, Lieutenant Howard, and Lieutenant Wisser left me and went to Paris. On Monday, September 15th, the marquis and his two boys, accompanied by a single manservant and two small hounds, entertained me by a short hunting expedition. We did not succeed in gett
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 69: transferred to New York city (search)
. Upham, Ll.D., of New York; in fact, Mr. Upham's reminiscences were invaluable. For years the hospitality of himself and, since his decease, of Mrs. Upham, who contributed liberally to my educational efforts in Tennessee, is full of bright sunshine in retrospect.. I enjoyed making a thorough study of Taylor's career, going to every place where history said he had been, and taking a trip to Old Mexico to see his battlefields. On this agreeable visit I was accompanied by Captain and Mrs. Guy Howard, Captain and Mrs. Charles R. Barnett, Mrs. Shoemaker and daughter, of Baltimore, and Mrs. Barnett's mother and sister. Before starting, the Mexican Minister Romero, who so generously befriended General Grant in New York, gave me letters to the President of the Mexican Republic and to others. Their kindness met me as soon as I crossed the border. At Camargo the commandant had his battalion under arms to do me honor at ten o'clock at night. The same thing occurred later, on our arriv
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
ach the Gospel? He answered: What do you mean, General Howard? I do preach the Gospel. I replied, I do noncy, which could not have been prevented. Lieutenant Guy Howard's efficiency brought him promotion to a capt95, we came to Burlington, Vt., where my son, Captain Guy Howard, continuing his work at Fort Ethan Allen, wasg for humanity, written the same year. My son Guy Howard was sent early before the struggle began to Atlanindicated to me the marked executive ability of Colonel Howard. Some great difficulty was had in arranging anGraham answered: Yes, I can. Who is he? Colonel Guy Howard. When can he go? By the next train. CColonel Howard did go by the next train, and the day after his arrival the two vessels had all their supplies ar, and put to sea. During all the operations Colonel Howard gave great satisfaction for the most effectivedied. Sergeant Harris, Second Infantry, whom Colonel Howard had selected to accompany him, seized the machi
, 252, 298, 344, 386, 414, 416, 442, 443, 455, 457, 458, 472, 497, 515, 537, 556; II, 24, 45, 78, 79, 285, 34, 396, 397, 549, 576. Howard, Chancey Otis, II, 546. Howard, Eliza Otis, I, 4-16. 591 Howard, Grace Ellen, I,86,96; 11,46. Howard, Guy, I, 69; II, 475, 476, 493, 538, 539, 565, 572, 573. Howard, Mrs., Guy, II, 538, 556,573, Howard, Harry S., II, 555, 656, 575. Howard, Helen, II, 493. Howard, Hildegard, II, 562. Howard, James W., II, 494, 495, 501, 514. HowarHoward, Mrs., Guy, II, 538, 556,573, Howard, Harry S., II, 555, 656, 575. Howard, Helen, II, 493. Howard, Hildegard, II, 562. Howard, James W., II, 494, 495, 501, 514. Howard, Mrs. James W., II, 559-561. Howard, Jesse, I, 7. Howard, John, Aid of Miles Stand-ish, I, 7. Howard, John, Lieut., II, 566. Howard, John, Philanthropist, II, 543. Howard, Mrs. O. O., I, 66, 67, 70, 95, 96, 107; II, 477, 545, 546, 550, 555, 576. Howard, Otis Woolworth, II, 493. Howard, Rowland B. (brother), I, 41, 71, 81, 119, 390, 443; II, 555. Howard, Rowland B. (father), I, 4, 11. Howard, Seth, I, 3, 4, 7, 20. Howard, Stillman, I, 16. Howard University, II,