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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 44: skirmishing at Cheraw and Fayetteville and the Battle of Averysboro (search)
were 4,500, mostly negroes, from my wing alone. Feeling pretty sure that Joe Johnston, our new adversary, who was somewhere in our path, would soon make a stand oConfederate force across the way near Averysboro. It proved to be Hardee, not Johnston, in immediate command. Kilpatrick came upon the enemy behind intrenchments anim to retreat without further battle. Now, it is plain from all accounts that Johnston in good earnest was gathering in all the troops he could at or near BentonvillD. Lee, Stevenson, Stewart, Cheatham, Hampton, and IIardee as near at hand. Johnston's instructions, which he received from Richmond, February 23d, at his residence: To concentrate all available forces and drive Sherman back. This was done, Johnston alleges, with a full consciousness on my part, however, that we could have no spassionate Southern men. With these instructions and this natural feeling, Johnston gathered from all quarters, as near as I can estimate, from 20,000 to 25,000 m
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
t Bentonville was not Sherman's objective. Johnston, on the other hand, had his eye upon Bentonviederate line of retreat. I hardly think that Johnston could have done better, even if he had follow been a little rash; another, that he thought Johnston had a larger command than he really did have;e had been enough bloodshed already, and that Johnston would surely retreat northward and leave us td to an extremity. The night of March 21st Johnston saw his line of retreat toward the north stildifference of 872. I have always accorded to Johnston due credit for boldness in his attack on our set of orders. Sherman, in these, located Johnston on the North Carolina Railroad at what was ca were following each other rapidly. That day Johnston sent in a flag of truce, and addressed to She they were there face to face, Sherman showed Johnston the telegraphic message from Washington. Theeneral terms which were signed by Sherman and Johnston and forwarded for the approval or disapproval[23 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 46: negro conditions during the Civil War (search)
s during the Civil War Before the beginning of the summer of 1865 the Civil War had been brought to a close. The Union volunteers were soon thereafter mustered out of the military service; and, carrying with them as tokens of honor their certificates of discharge, proud of their achievements, and full of hope for a happy and prosperous future, they joyfully sought their widely scattered homes. The Confederate soldiers who had confronted them for four long years, from Generals Lee and Johnston to the humblest privates in the ranks, were treated with delicacy and kindness by our officers. After their surrender, however disappointed they might be at the result of the conflict, they were, nevertheless, not without spirit and hope. So, enjoying an American's confidence in his ability to get on in the world and protected by Grant's generous parole, they returned to their Southern households. They found their farms stripped, their plantations overgrown with weeds, their cotton destr