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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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we at last came upon the principal defenses of the city of Atlanta. They were made up of small forts or redoubts, fitted forned the hilly prominences that faced in all directions. Atlanta then looked to us like a hill city defended by encircling . McPherson's army had two corps in line, Logan's-facing Atlanta, and Blair'scarrying on his line bending back to its termiey talked they heard some skirmish firing near them toward Atlanta; suddenly there was the duller sound of distant cannon offee now deliberately began his march while Hood in front of Atlanta was holding the forts and curtains opposite Thomas and Schvered before his enterprising foes could carry them off to Atlanta. This was the group. I had never till then seen Sherman Every Confederate who was not made a prisoner fled toward Atlanta, and Captain DeGress, though his horses were killed during the outside Confederates and those defending the works of Atlanta. Sherman, whose face now relaxed into a pleasant mood, sa
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 36: Battle of Ezra Church (search)
a mile and a half to the Lick Skillet road. When he took me to a high point and showed me a wooded ridge between us and Atlanta, along which he desired me to form my troops, substantially connecting with Thomas, but following the curve of the Atlanners. After the battle of Ezra Church, Hood confined himself to the defensive as long as we were in the neighborhood of Atlanta. That evening my ambition stimulated me to put in fresh troops in order to sweep the field and make a bold and strong effort to capture Atlanta; but Logan's men were much fatigued. Blair's and Dodge's had been on the qui vive all day within reach of the enemy's cannonade, constantly kept up, and Morgan's division had not succeeded in joining us; the Atlanta worksough the firing of his artillery and infantry rear guard. Then he hastened within the protection of the strong forts of Atlanta. 1 General Stephen D. Lee at this writing, 1907, is the Commander of the Society of Confederate Veterans, with his ho
clared that our cavalry could not or would not make a sufficient lodgment on the railroad below Atlanta, and that nothing would suffice but for us to reach it with the main body. After the discomf. Forrest and Wheeler, with abundant horses, were sent against our long line of supply between Atlanta and Nashville; Forrest above and Wheeler below Chattanooga with hope of drawing Sherman away from Atlanta, so that Hood could fall on his rear with his main army. But these efforts of the Confederate cavalry were as effectually thwarted by Sherman as Sherman's cavalry had been by Hood.. Hood all liked his bright face and happy stories. Meanwhile, the work of extending our line near Atlanta had gone on. Hood's intrenchments had followed suit, ever protecting his railroad, a vital lineoubt to his country's service. At one period Sherman had heavy guns brought up and bombarded Atlanta, carrying into it terror and destruction. This was not sufficient, however, to induce Hood to
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 37: Battle of Lovejoy's Station and capture of Atlanta (search)
7: Battle of Lovejoy's Station and capture of Atlanta Hood now, doubtless with intense reluctancle part of his army, blew up his magazines in Atlanta and left in the nighttime, when the Twentiethral Slocum, took possession of the place. So Atlanta is ours and fairly won. To which Presidentowly and deliberately to move back and occupy Atlanta, enjoy a short period of rest, and think awhi Point, between six and seven miles south of Atlanta; while the Army of the Ohio covered our eastevidence of the feeling after Sherman's taking Atlanta in New England, I will introduce a few impreseral Sherman is banishing all the people from Atlanta, north or south, as they may elect. In the and enjoyable than during our sojourn about Atlanta. Supplies came in to refresh our men. We enj. I refer to his action in sending away from Atlanta the bulk of the residents, giving them the op condensed into one expression-the march from Atlanta to the sea. When his plan was finally sett[13 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 39: General Hood's northward march; Sherman in pursuit; battle of Allatoona (search)
rch; Sherman in pursuit; battle of Allatoona During our stay at Atlanta one very important work was accomplished besides the reviewing of accounts of what each army was doing while encamped, the one about Atlanta, and the other at first in the vicinity of Lovejoy's Station, and atch and harass whatever Sherman might keep in the neighborhood of Atlanta. Hood crossed the Chattahoochee, with Jackson's cavalry in advane and the crossing of the Etowah. Sherman's force in and. about Atlanta now numbered little over 60,000. General Elliott then commandedal Davis: Communicate with Howard, and be prepared to send into Atlanta all your traps and to move with ten days rations toward Marietta oexcept Slocum, with his Twentieth Corps, who was left back to keep Atlanta for our return. Sherman's first surmise of only two Confederate c near Lost Mountain. Now we commenced the pursuit in earnest from Atlanta the morning of October 3d. By the 5th we had reached the vicinity
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. (search)
Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. The Army ofood's raid, were brought together at Rome and Atlanta. While we rested, they were carefully removestores of every kind that had accumulated at Atlanta were sent back as fast as possible. Generahis respect as did our Chief Quartermaster at Atlanta. Then, on November 10th, after he had demolievacuated Rome and commenced his march toward Atlanta. During November 12th the troops with me descamp and proceeded from Smyrna Camp Ground to Atlanta. We chose a place for concentration at a rai. My army did not witness the destruction of Atlanta. While Sherman, accompanied by Slocum, com The size of his command was: Return to Atlanta Effective muskets (sent from Jonesboro)1,900 army across all their roads of egress toward Atlanta, Milledgeville, Augusta, or Savannah; hence ctially at Gordon. Our marches at first (from Atlanta), until we reached Ocmulgee, were very pleasa
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 41: the march to the sea; capture of Fort McAllister and Savannah (search)
till January 1, 1865. On New Year's Day Sherman took me aside and said that we were to move on through the Carolinas as soon as possible. He had a map of the coast in his hand. Opening it he showed me Robertsville in South Carolina, and also Pocotaligo Junction, on the Savannah & Charleston Railroad. It was not far from Pocotaligo that the Confederates, including G. W. Smith's Macon contingent, had met Foster's and Saxton's Union men and defeated them while we were on the march from Atlanta to the sea. Sherman said that he wanted me to move my wing of the army by water over to the Island of Beaufort, S. C., and go thence northward, cross an arm of the sea, secure a landing, and then proceed to Pocotaligo. I must time myself so as to get there by January 15th (inst.). Can you do it There were too many elements in the problem presented to be solved offhand. After, Yankeelike, asking some questions, I said that the time was rather short, but we would do the best we could.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 42: March through the Carolinas; Savannah, Ga., to Columbia, S. C. (search)
nfederates that were always in their advancing way. On February 7th we were out of the woods on the Augusta & Charleston Railroad, near the village of Midway, and destroying the road four miles up and down. The double — forked Edisto River was still ahead. We searched out the crossing as soon as we could drive the Confederates back enough to do so. Holman's, Cannon's, Binnaker's, Walker's, Skillings's, and the railway bridges were examined. Sherman, then with Logan at Lowry's Station (Atlanta & Charleston Railroad), gave us a special field order, directing the taking of Orangeburg. The swampy approaches to the south fork of the Edisto, the cypress, and other trees thickly studding a wide stretch, and the high water extending back hundreds of yards on our side of the river, might have disheartened any men not made up like our experienced and resolute veterans. How we skirmished up Blair's men under Mower and Force at Binnaker's Bridge, and Logan's under Hazen, and John E. Smi
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 48: organization of the freedmen's Bureau and my principles of action (search)
command of the Army and Department of the Tennessee, certainly till the final muster out. A few days before the Grand Review at Washington General Sherman called me into the office of General Townsend, the adjutant general of the army. We were there by ourselves. General Sherman then said that he wanted me to surrender the command of the army to Logan before the Review. This caused me much feeling, and under the pressure of it I replied that I had maneuvered and fought this army from Atlanta (July 27, 1864), all the way through. Sherman replied: I know it, but it will be everything to Logan to have this opportunity. Then, speaking very gently, as Sherman could, to one near him whom he esteemed, he said: Howard, you are a Christian, and won't mind such a sacrifice. I answered: Surely, if you put it on that ground, I submit. He then wrote me the following letter, which never reached me until forty years after in Hartford, Conn. It was handed to me by Mr. Horace B. Austin, i
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 58: beginning of Howard University (search)
Many ministers felt themselves to be unlearned, and so sought such knowledge of books as they could get. Negro pharmacists and other medical men were soon required, and contentions with white men in the courts demanded friendly advocates at law. Under the evident and growing necessity for higher education, in 1866 and 1867, a beginning was made. Various good schools of a collegiate grade were started in the South, and normal classes were about this time added, as at Hampton, Charleston, Atlanta, Macon, Savannah, Memphis, Louisville, Mobile, Talladega, Nashville, New Orleans, and elsewhere. In every way, as commissioner, I now encouraged the higher education, concerning which there was so much interest, endeavoring to adhere to my principle of Government aid in dealing with the benevolent associations. These, by 1867, had broken away from a common union, and were again pushing forward their denominational enterprises, but certainly, under the Bureau's supervision, nowhere did
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