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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 8 document sections:

Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 46: negro conditions during the Civil War (search)
ny thousands of blacks of all ages, clad in rags, with no possessions except the nondescript bundles of all sizes which the adults carried on their backs, had come together at Norfolk, Hampton, Alexandria, and Washington. Sickness, want of food and shelter, sometimes resulting in crime, appealed to the sympathies of every feeling heart. Landless, homeless, helpless families in multitudes, including a proportion of wretched white people, were flocking northward from Tennessee and Kentucky, Arkansas and Missouri. They were, it is true, for a time not only relieved by army rations, spasmodically issued, but were met most kindly by various volunteer societies of the North-societies which gathered their means from churches and individuals at home and abroad. During the spring of 1863, many different groups and crowds of freedmen and refugees, regular and irregular, were located near the long and broken line of division between the armies of the North and South, ranging from Maryland
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 48: organization of the freedmen's Bureau and my principles of action (search)
adquarters at Richmond. Colonel Eliphalet Whittlesey, North Carolina, Headquarters at Raleigh. General Rufus Saxton, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Headquarters, Beaufort, S. C. Colonel T. W. Osborn, Alabama, Headquarters, Mobile. Colonel Samuel Thomas, Mississippi, Headquarters, Vicksburg. Chaplain T. W. Conway, Louisiana, Headquarters, New Orleans. General Clinton B. Fisk, Kentucky and Tennessee, Headquarters, Nashville, Tenn. General J. W. Sprague, Missouri and Arkansas, Headquarters, St. Louis, Mo. Colonel John Eaton, District of Columbia. In the above order, owing to General Saxton's long experience with the freedmen, he was given three States. Colonel Brown had also been long at work for the freedmen in Virginia, and for this reason, though I did not personally know him, I gave him the preference for that State. The same thing was true of Chaplain Conway in Louisiana. I deemed Louisiana a hard field for freedmen's affairs and was glad to take ad
ces of town property.Number of Acres Land.Number of pieces of town property. CultivatedUncultivatedUnclassifiedAggregate Georgia and South Carolina9,36450,799374,837435,000398384 Kentucky and Tennessee10,17729,07225,88065,129414 Missouri and Arkansas18,73618,73672 Alabama2,1162,11613 Virginia2,62549,11023,91875,6533426,730310 North Carolina4,8689,20722,26736,34211250,029287 Mississippi and Louisiana (part)50,75148,52559,2805211,41160 Louisiana62,52862,528501136 Maryland and Virginia (pg been pledged as to leases and contracts for the coming year, it would be unwise to commit them to any State agencies. Again, I urged that to render any portion of the freedmen able to take advantage of the homestead law in Florida, Louisiana, Arkansas, or in other States where there were public lands, aid must be furnished the settlers in the way of transportation, temporary food, and shelter and implements of husbandry. To render this relief offered effective, more time than our present law
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 50: courts for freedmen; medical care and provision for orphans (search)
ates he had, in his efforts among the planters, remarkable success. Tennessee had early found a renewal of public confidence, and the planters of that State had quickly absorbed the labor found in their midst. General Sprague in Missouri and Arkansas, too, except in impoverished districts, had readily found employment for workingmen, white or black. By the close of 1865, he believed that the active demand for labor was in a great measure settling the condition of society. The negroes wereing the cotton fields, having employment and good wages. The contracts made were for the most part carried out. Sprague, of a manly and popular turn himself, had secured the cooperation of the military commanders and the provisional governor of Arkansas of recent appointment. Missouri was better off; she had become a free State with fairly good laws protecting the rights of the freedmen just enacted; so that the operations of the Bureau almost ceased there. In the District of Columbia and v
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 52: President Johnson's reconstruction and further bureau legislation for 1866 (search)
, where he could reach their haunts, to suspend their base work of terrorism which they had undertaken among the freedmen and their teachers. General J. W. Sprague, most manly and fearless of men, in October of 1866 was no longer sanguine for Arkansas in the line of justice. The legislature did not grant the negroes their rights. He feared to give cases to State officers on account of their manifest prejudice and unfairness. He could not, he confessed, carry out his Bureau instructions witinctions were constantly made in all dealings with them. His chief troubles consisted in his efforts to protect them from violence; he entreated for more troops for those remoter districts where the greater number of outrages occurred. As in Arkansas, where the interests of the larger planters came in play, the Bureau agents became a help, a necessity. A lack of confidence existed between the planters and freedmen, until the assistant commissioner had successfully inaugurated a system of co
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 53: the bureau work in 1866; President Johnson's first opposition (search)
he Bureau in that State. It is a little singular that officers long ago relieved from duty should be chosen as exponents of the present management of the Freedmen's Bureau. The report with reference to Texas rather commends than censures the administration in that State. One officer, Captain Sloan, is condemned for perjury, and for his conduct in office. A subsequent examination of his case has furnished a more favorable report. The case will have a thorough investigation. Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee were not visited by the inspectors, and it is fair to suppose that the administration of the Bureau in those States is as it has been represented by the assistant commissioners and other officers and by reliable citizens. It should be noted, with regard to expenses, that aside from commissary, quartermaster, and medical issues, the entire expenses of the Freedmen's Bureau have been defrayed, from its organization up to July 1st, without an appropriation, and wit
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 55: first appropriation by congress for the bureau; the reconstruction Act, March 2, 1867; increase of educational work (search)
South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Florida, Texas, and Arkansas; and whereas, it is necessary that peace and good order should be enforced in e H. Thomas for Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; General Ord for Mississippi and Arkansas, and General Sheridan for Louisiana and Texas. All these officers, as will apir instruction, as far as they could go, thorough and accurate. To the State of Arkansas there had come a new commander and assistant commissioner, General C. H. to become the Western general superintendent of the Northern Pacific Railway. Arkansas was a difficult State to reconstruct, and progress, especially in the line of s, even among the better class of former slaveholders; yet in the aggregate in Arkansas the colored people had made great gains. They were allowed to testify in the l they possibly could to bring knowledge to their children. The teachers in Arkansas often had a difficult task; but some of them overcame even ugly prejudice, wh
t and hung colored men. Their lifeless bodies were found, but the secrets were so well kept that no guilty parties could be discovered. In some places negroes were taken out and whipped (as a rule by night) and there was no clew to the perpetrators. Even United States agents dared not hold a public meeting in that region-a gathering at night of negroes at any place would be regarded with suspicion by the whites and result in outrage and suffering to the blacks. The aspect of society in Arkansas in the summer and fall of 1868 presented similar combined secret planning and movement. Lawlessness, rowdyism, and depredations in some parts of the State for a while ran riot. Union men were driven from their homes and freedmen subjected to the grossest maltreatment. In Crittenden county, Mr. E. G. Barker, our Bureau agent, was shot and severely wounded, August 12, 1868. An attempt to assassinate him at Hamburg, Ashley county, two years before had failed to end his life, but the wounds