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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,057 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 106 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 70 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for George Washington or search for George Washington in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 37: Battle of Lovejoy's Station and capture of Atlanta (search)
yed his depots, trains, and such supplies as he could not carry off. The quantities of ammunition stored there, of course, occasioned the heaviest explosions. He had hardly evacuated the city before Slocum marched in. The first dispatch to Washington was from Slocum, September 2d, as follows: General Sherman has taken Atlanta. The Twentieth Corps occupies the city. The main army is on the Macon road, near East Point. A battle was fought near that point, in which General Sherman was suand doubtless they were sorry when the time came for them to return to posts of active hostility. President Davis's visit to Hood's army was an interesting event. General Sherman detected his presence in Georgia, and telegraphed the news to Washington as early as September 25th. The Confederate record at Hood's headquarters reads: President Davis, accompanied by two of his aids-de-camp, arrived at these headquarters at about 3 P. M., September 26th. The President and General Hood, with
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
sed into a side room, and as soon as they were there face to face, Sherman showed Johnston the telegraphic message from Washington. The effect upon Johnston was very marked. Sherman says: The perspiration came out in great drops on his forehead, anith the other paragraph, which defined political rights and franchises, was what caused such a furor of opposition from Washington. The whole agreement was disapproved by President Johnson, and Grant was ordered to resume hostilities at the earlieant read the memorandum of agreement carefully, put his approval upon it, and leaving us the next day, took the same to Washington. On that day, April 26th, Halleck sent a dispatch to the Secretary of War, showing that troops had been sent from the ohnston to-day, and expect other terms will be arranged. Grant came back with Major Hitchcock (Sherman's messenger to Washington), was present at my review of the Seventeenth Corps day before yesterday, and yesterday he visited and rode among the c
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 54: public addresses concerning the freedmen in 1866, advocating education (search)
ther professional man — who attempts to stop the wheels of progress will be sooner or later crushed to atoms. Shall we sacrifice the Republic that we have saved? The church must stand up and tell the truth. Whenever you Christians have the opportunity to say what you think, say it I Stand firm for your own convictions of truth and duty. Mr. Lincoln gave us the principle-With malice toward none, with charity for all, but with firmness in the right as God gave us to see the right. George Washington was our beginning. We have been brought on substantially and securely by his glorious successor, Abraham Lincoln. As his countrymen let us not hide our light, but speak the truth, yet speak it kindly in the fear of the Lord. Resolutions strong and good were unanimously adopted. Then Senator Evans gave a ringing speech, asking: Is it possible that anyone should ever conceive that the religion of Christ could be modified to suit one class of people differently from another; that i
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 64: superintendent of the United States military Academy; commanding Department of the Platte, Omaha, Neb. (search)
e watch to supervise and report delinquencies. What resulted from this sudden severity, indicated by the cases I have given, affected the character of the corps. I found young men who happened to be seen off limits running to cover, skulking, and hiding behind logs. It seemed to be just the thing to do to avoid an officer and deceive him, and break the regulations without scruple. On February 22d, after I took command, I gave an address to the corps of cadets upon the character of Washington, and showed them plainly what I thought of the conduct described, and I told them how much ashamed their friends were of this evident want of manliness. I said further, that I proposed to relieve them of the stringency that had been put upon them. The guards would be as they formerly were, and-taken off at ten o'clock at night; the instructors should take up their quarters elsewhere, and no officer be allowed to report them from behind windows and sheltered places. I wished them to re
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 67: France and Germany; Convention of young men's Christian Association, Berlin, 1884 (search)
in French. He smiled and said that I could try. So, mustering courage, I took a memorandum book from my pocket and wrote down a brief address in which I called the attention of the people to the sympathy between our two republics. I told them how the name of Lafayette was regarded in our country and pointed out some things which Lafayette had so generously done for us during our Revolutionary War; and spoke of the mutual attachment and friendship that had always existed between him and Washington. I submitted my proposed address to M. Chauvet. He ran it over and made a few corrections and returned the manuscript to me with the comment, C'est bon. I read my composition as well as I could to the audience, and was surprised at the evident sympathy and marked applause which punctuated my queer delivery. This was my first and last attempt to give a public address in French. It was Friday, August 8th, when I left Evreux for Paris. Mr. Beddhoes, my English fellow-student, very kin
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 69: transferred to New York city (search)
er since. One trouble with having regular Indian military companies was that white soldiers would not serve under Indian noncommissioned officers, and another difficulty was the impossibility of having an Indian's family with him. They, however, made the best of irregular troops and scouts. It was not long before all the young Indians were mustered out and joined their people. In the same year in New York City we had the Washington Centennial Parade in honor of the inauguration of George Washington. It lasted three days. On the last day of the month of April was the military participation. All the troops I could gather were brought together and led in column. Major General Fitzgerald, being a major general commanding the New York National Guard, objected to the regulars preceding his troops, because commanded by only a lieutenant colonel of engineers. I had been requested to join the President and others at the reviewing stand, but as soon as the difficulty was reported to m