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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
home of the four chickens happily roasted, of the tenderly boiled leg of mutton and its rich surroundings of butter sauce, of the sweet and Irish potatoes, of the tomatoes, Indian pudding, and whiskey and water that made up the fare of the suffering soldier in the field, I fear the New York Tribune would have howled Onward to Richmond! with more relentless energy than ever before. At this date, too, a rumor reached us that there had been a fight at Harper's Ferry, with a report that a Colonel Ashby, as prisoner, had just passed through our camp to headquarters. Nine days before, our Captain Tompkins, commanding the Rhode Island Battery at Sandy Hook, had written me that there were fourteen hundred Rebels at Halltown witl two twelve-pounders, and that a Major Gould wished him to take his guns over to-day. As the river is very high, writes the captain, should we, under such circumstances, be obliged to retreat, we shall have a rough time of it. This was about all there was to the
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
lluded to. Leaving Colonel Burks to support Ashby, Jackson led Fulkerson's brigade and part of turned instantly in pursuit. On the 22d, when Ashby drove in Shields's pickets, he discovered only was: Infantry, 3,087; artillery, 27 guns; and Ashby's cavalry. --Jackson's Offcial Report. Fromtillery. Through the day we had been fighting Ashby, with his cavalry and horse artillery,--the rear-guard of Jackson's army. Ashby's cavalry force numbered about one thousand, and, as cavalry, weer we could give them odds and beat them, too. Ashby was as cool and brave as he was experienced. d lifting by the coat-collar from his horse to Ashby's own, and so bearing him off, the other of twed a new horse, one belonging to an officer of Ashby's cavalry, captured by one of our skirmishers saucers. He had unerringly made straight for Ashby. Where you don get dat horse? he exclaimeded, was not so haughtily returned. I doubt if Ashby had ever been in harness, until I clothed his [14 more...]
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
run when we approached. It was Jackson's faithful officer, Ashby, against whom our fourteen guns had been daily pouring forte of Mount Jackson, we proceeded more leisurely. As usual, Ashby put his guns in position once or twice on a wooded hill, anng over us; but he did no harm. Our batteries replied, and Ashby moved on. Thus we proceeded until the bridge across the creckson was reached, where there was some heavy skirmishing. Ashby with his white horse was conspicuous in an attempt to burn the door for a while, though there is but little doubt that Ashby and Moseby finally got even with the sutlers, and restored Which turned out to be nothing more than a demonstration by Ashby. As absurd as I then believed the rumor, unless Jackson hads most noticeable. Now there was no pursuit, no ubiquitous Ashby: it was a dull, tame, dead-level of safety. The important Mount Jackson, which in fight and in flight on our advance Ashby had attempted to destroy, and which it was necessary to pre
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 5: return to Strasburg (continued)—Banks's flight to WinchesterBattle of Winchester. (search)
ld be misled. On the twenty-ninth of April, Ashby made demonstrations in force towards Harrisonbwas ignorant; for when we abandoned New Market Ashby occupied it, and posted scouts as far as Stras regiments of cavalry, Cavalry regiments of Ashby, Munford, and Flournoy, with eight battalions es of the Blue Ridge towards Washington, while Ashby's cavalry with Flournoy, crossing the South FoJackson's infantry was engaged at Front Royal, Ashby's cavalry, fording the Forks of the Shenandoahle marched by a crossroad towards Middletown. Ashby moved in Jackson's front with batteries, and cforward to a commanding position at a gallop. Ashby, at the head of his cavalry, threw himself forthe confused mass that filled the streets; and Ashby, swooping down, took advantage of this disordersuit, not of the enemy, but of plunder, until Ashby was obliged to arrest the pursuit. Alas, groas to block up the road completely. 3 Thus did Ashby's cavalry thunder down on the defenceless wago[9 more...]
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
ired. Where was Steuart with his three cavalry regiments,--Ashby's, Munford's, and Flournoy's,--to oppose General Hatch withIt appears that the cavalry failed Jackson because those of Ashby's command had not yet been collected since they scattered fclared, the reach of successful pursuit. With what cavalry Ashby could collect, he moved by way of Berryville to Harper's Fe to these Allan thinks about 40 should be added, to include Ashby's loss, and that in the Louisiana troops at Front Royal, an Southerner, which he was by birth, he volunteered to drive Ashby to Martinsburg in an ambulance: Ashby, it appears, was wounAshby, it appears, was wounded at Front Royal in the shoulder, and could not mount a horse. Following in the rear of our retreating army amid cannonadie reported cruelties, but upon one occasion was directed by Ashby to see if one of our men lying by the road-side was alive. o the adjoining field to prevent mutilation by animals, was Ashby's order. It does not come within the scope of this narra
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Appendix C: Report of surgeon Lafayette Guild, Confederate State Army, medical Director, of the killed and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. (search)
naStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryStarke'sJackson's2220 7th Virginia CavalryAshby'sJackson's1616160 17th Virginia BatteryAshby'sJackson's12330 Maj. Andrews, Chief of artillery Ashby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th ViAshby'sJackson's12330 Maj. Andrews, Chief of artillery Ashby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's12425250 31st VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31720200 52d VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31013130 58th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's22830300 12th GeorgaTrimble'sEwell's73340400 21st North CarolinaTrimble'sEwell's222 15th AlabamaTrimble'sEwell's3330 33d North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's63036360 7th North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. HiAshby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's12425250 31st VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31720200 52d VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31013130 58th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's22830300 12th GeorgaTrimble'sEwell's73340400 21st North CarolinaTrimble'sEwell's222 15th AlabamaTrimble'sEwell's3330 33d North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's63036360 7th North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's11220 28th North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's32629290 37th North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's21315150 18th North Carolina Branch'sA. P. Hill's11314140 1st TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's42024240 7th TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's43034340 14th TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's33134340 6th Alabama BattalionArcher'sA. P. Hill's189
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
the colonelcy of the Second, 272. His sang froid and bravery in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 305, 306, 312. Extract from his letter to Gen. Gordon, 316, 317. Ashby, Colonel, commander of Rebel cavalry, 123, 136. Coolness and intrepidity of, 137,--and wonderful stories about, 137, 210. Useful to Jackson as a cavalry commander, 152, 187,189, 200, 251. His troops prefer stealing to fighting, 213. His compassion to an enemy, 254. Ashby, a famous war-horse belonging to General Gordon,--history of, with a description of his character and an account of his death, 140-148. Auger, General, division commander under Banks, 276, 277. Wounded in the batt Advances to Middletown, where he has a fight with General Hatch, 209. His disappointment at not capturing Banks at Strasburg, 212. Delayed by the delinquency of Ashby's cavalry, 213. Advances to Newtown, where he is checked by General Gordon, 214. He enters Newtown at last as a conqueror, 218,--and pursues General Gordon, whos