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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
of May 6, 1861, from F. A. Osborn. Frank H. Tucker, applying for quartermaster or captaincy, May 6, 1861. George P. Bangs, letter recommending, May 6. William Cogswell, letter, May 8, 1861, from Governor Andrew. I find the names of Charles G. Loring, Jr., W. B. Williams, C. F. Morse, Rufus Choate, S. M. Quincy, Richardin time to the preceding was on the eighth of May, when the Governor applied to me to receive the Andrew Light guard, --a company raised in Salem by the then Captain Cogswell; as it will add, writes the Governor, to the completion of your command, to aid which I shall always be happy. On the ninth of May the Governor applied tos, as follows: Abbott, full; Quincy, probably full; Savage, 80; Curtis, 80; Cary (Lowell men), 80; Underwood, 82; Tucker, 33; Goodwin, not noted; Whitney, full; Cogswell, full. The date of this paper (unfortunately it is a matter of surmise) must have been later than the fourteenth of May, for then, by the history of the Secon
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
tain Hardy, the Assistant Adjutant-General of Colonel Baker, appeared with Colonel Cogswell. Colonel Cogswell, commanding a Tammany regiment of Baker's brigade, had mColonel Cogswell, commanding a Tammany regiment of Baker's brigade, had managed to cross during the fight, and now, claiming to be the ranking officer among the survivors, directed an attempt to be made to open communication with Edward's stantly acceded, saying it was no time to discuss rank, that he would obey Colonel Cogswell's orders; and orders were then given to move by the left flank. About twowere very knock-kneed. Colonel Lee says it was hard to tell which of the two, Cogswell or Evans, both having been old friends in the old army, was the more overcome ed his unwilling guest to join him in a convivial draught of peach brandy, and Cogswell was saying to his conqueror, I tell ye, Shanks, sha'n't take my parole on any ; I'll see you damned first, Shanks. General Evans had offered to release Colonel Cogswell if he would sign a parole not to fight again during the war, and this the.
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 5: return to Strasburg (continued)—Banks's flight to WinchesterBattle of Winchester. (search)
rk and a section of Best's Battery. As Companies A and C, Captains Abbott and Cogswell, passed through the main street, followed by supporting companies of the regimd thrown out as his rearguard two companies of the Second (Captains Abbott and Cogswell), with a third company (Captain Williams) as flankers. At a short distance inous: Captain Abbott commanded one platoon, posted on one side of the road; Captain Cogswell another, on the other side ; while in the centre were two platoons from th of this Company, on the right and left, platoons from Companies B and C, Captains Cogswell and Williams. The increased fire produced a marked effect upon the enemoops, overcome with fatigue, fell asleep where they were halted,all except Captain Cogswell, who was ordered, with his company, upon outpost duty. It was with regreting all the fatigue of the two days through which our regiment had passed, Captain Cogswell maintained stoutly through the remainder of the night his unequal combat w
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
232, 233. Killed at the battle of Cedar Mountain, 332. Cedar Mountain, battle of, 282-313. A criticism of the plan of, 335-337. Chapman, Colonel, of the Fifth Connecticut, in battle of Cedar Mountain, 305. Clark, Colonel, 327, 328. Cogswell, William, holds a captaincy in the Second Mass. Regiment, 12. Is in the fight in Banks's flight to Winchester, 219, 224, 227. Cogswell, Colonel, of a New York regiment, succeeds Colonel Baker in command at the battle of Ball's Bluff, 76. IsCogswell, Colonel, of a New York regiment, succeeds Colonel Baker in command at the battle of Ball's Bluff, 76. Is taken prisoner, and refuses parole, 78. Colgrove, Colonel, in command of the Twenty-seventh Indiana Regiment in Banks's flight to Winchester, 207, -and in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 308, 309 (and notes). Comey, Captain, 241 (note). Cook, Major, Federal officer, wounded and captured at Cedar Mountain, p04. Cooke, John Esten, his Life of Jackson, 117, 129, 130, 156, 184, 198, 199, 210, 212-214, 217-219, 233, 234, 295. Copeland, R. M., Quartermaster of the Second Mass. Regiment,