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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 40 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 11 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 17 5 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 13 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for Taliaferro or search for Taliaferro in all documents.

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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
r at Massanutten town, and thence to Luray. Colonel Sullivan of Shields's division, who had been left to guard Columbia Bridge, informed Banks, about the first of May, that a deserter reported that on the thirtieth of April Jackson had moved with his whole force towards Harrisonburg; whence, he believed, he had returned and marched towards Port Republic. Tile deserter estimated his whole force to be about fifteen thousand men, composed of twelve or fifteen regiments commanded by Jackson, Taliaferro, Winder, and Ewell, and added that Jackson expected additional reinforcements. That Colonel Sullivan was in the same state of excitement as when at Strasburg was apparent from a despatch received from him, dated at Columbia Bridge at 2.25 P. M., addressed by signal to General Banks, announcing that Rebels drove in my pickets at Burnt Bridge and on Gordonsville road; started out reinforcements and am now driving them; will report fully. Burnt Bridge lies south of Columbia Bridge, over wh
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 5: return to Strasburg (continued)—Banks's flight to WinchesterBattle of Winchester. (search)
On Sunday, the 5th, Jackson reached Staunton; the next day his troops arrived. So secretly had he moved that the people of the town were surprised. On the morning of the 7th the army moved against Milroy. Edwards's brigade in advance; .then Taliaferro's (3d); next Colonel Campbell's (2d); and in the rear the Stonewall brigade, General C. S. Winder (the 1st). The corps of Cadets of the Virginia Military Institute, where Jackson had. been a superintendent, was attached to the expedition. The line. Night came on. The battle, which had lasted four hours,--from half-past 4 to halfpast eight,--ended with the retreat of the Federals. The Confederate forces actually in the battle consisted of Johnson's brigade (six regiments), and of Taliaferro's brigade (three regiments). Colonel Campbell's brigade arrived in time to be used in protecting the right flank, but was not engaged, and the Stonewall brigade was some miles in rear. The nine regiments engaged numbered about 4,500 men, and C
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
compel Donelly to retire? This is quite probable: Banks avers it in his report. Why then did I withdraw? To answer this, I resume my narrative. For two hours the Stonewall brigade (Jackson's own, under General Winder), with Carpenter's and Taliaferro's brigades, and three batteries, had been held in check on the heights opposite by the rifles of the Second Massachusetts, and by the battery of six Parrotts on our flank. During this time the roar of artillery and infantry on our left before , Jackson, setting spurs to his horse, bounded upon the crest, and shouted to the officers nearest to him, Forward after the enemy! Then, on right, left, and centre, they swarmed in pursuit. There in front were the Stonewall, Carpenter's, and Taliaferro's brigades; to my right was Taylor's brigade; and hurrying up from the reserve was Elzey's,--all in pursuit of my four regiments, who were now in full retreat for the town. Dabney's Life of Jackson, p. 109. On right, left, and centre, im
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 8: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
, which was concealed by the woods on our side of the same field; Taliaferro's brigade was drawn up parallel to and facing the road, in rear o of the wheat-field and immediately opposite Crawford. Then came Taliaferro's brigade, which closed the gap between Early's left and Garnett'ries in their front, while two brigades Thomas's, Early's, and Taliaferro's. and more batteries of the enemy were ready to spring from the n's line was turned and its rear gained. Then, while the left of Taliaferro's brigade gave way, Geary's blows upon its right and upon the lef in their histories. As Campbell had been overthrown, so next was Taliaferro; and then came the left of Early's brigade, which, first wavering in a moment restored the failing battle. Fragments of Early and Taliaferro returned to their places, forming around that heroic nucleus, the little space, the infantry of Branch closed in upon their right, Taliaferro and Early upon their left, and opened fire, when it fled to the r
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
into the forest. In the woods upon which Jackson now directed his attack, nothing but my three small regiments was left to confront not less than five Brigades of Branch, Archer, and Pender of Hill's division, the Stonewall brigade and Taliaferro's, with what was left of Garnett's of Jackson's own division. entire brigades of the enemy, of which four were in line when we came upon the field, and one reaching far around to envelop our right. Of the ten brigades which Jackson threw — outnions of his friends (as he conceived them) more than the bayonets of his enemies, should have hesitated to send me the order I received? There remains to tell that when Jackson swung his forces around my command, he at the same time ordered Taliaferro's brigade to charge, bearing towards its right (the position of the field of Indian corn) against our left and in front of Early's brigade. At this time General Prince, in ignorance of what had transpired, was riding to where Geary had been,
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Appendix C: Report of surgeon Lafayette Guild, Confederate State Army, medical Director, of the killed and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. (search)
VirginiaJones'sJackson's184462620 1st Virginia BattalionJones'sJackson's1010100 10th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's63743430 28d VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's31518180 87th VirginiaTaliaferro's JacTaliaferro's Jackson's31518180 87th VirginiaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 47th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'Taliaferro's Jackson's127688880 47th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's25770 15th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryStarke'sJackson's2220 7th Virginia CavalryAshby'sTaliaferro's Jackson's127688880 48th AlabamaTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's25770 15th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryStarke'sJackson's2220 7th Virginia CavalryAshby'sJackson's1616160 17th Virginia BatteryAshby'sJackson's12330 Maj. Andrews, Chief of artillery Ashby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's12425250 31st VirTaliaferro's Jackson's126173730 2d LouisianaStarke'sJackson's5550 9th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's24660 10th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's25770 15th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's2220 14th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's13440 6th LouisianaStarke'sJackson's1910100 Hampden's ArtilleryStarke'sJackson's2220 7th Virginia CavalryAshby'sJackson's1616160 17th Virginia BatteryAshby'sJackson's12330 Maj. Andrews, Chief of artillery Ashby'sJackson's1110 13th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's23234340 25th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's12425250 31st VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31720200 52d VirginiaEarly'sEwell's31013130 58th VirginiaEarly'sEwell's22830300 12th GeorgaTrimble'sEwell's73340400 21st North CarolinaTrimble'sEwell's222 15th AlabamaTrimble's
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
quoted from, 71, 72, 77, 79, 80. Is arrested, and confined in Fort Lafayette, 99. Strasburg, Va., occupied and fortified by Banks's corps, 173,174. Banks's retreat from, to Winchester (Va.), 201-224. Strother, Mr., his Recollections of a Campaign in Virginia, 202 (note), 294 (note), 330, 331 (note), 348-350. Sullivan, Colonel, Federal officer, 133, 164, 165. Surgeon, a Rebel, how he was captured and interviewed by General Gordon, 216, 217. What he said to Banks, 225. T Taliaferro, Genera], Rebel officer in Stonewall Jackson's army, 177, 240, 289, 292, 295, 318. Taylor, Colonel, Rebel officer under Stonewall Jackson, 209, 237, 240. Telegraph, an exasperating yet amusing talk by, 41-44. Tenth Maine Regiment, the, its heroic conduct and terrible loss in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 298-302. Theatrical company, a, among soldiers, 173, 201. Account of one of them concerning Rebel cruelties, 254. Thomas, George H., commands Federal forces in Civil War, 3