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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, List of maps and illustrations. (search)
List of maps and illustrations. Map showing the Movements of the Federal and Confederate Armies in the Shenandoah Valley, in Maryland, and in the Region of the Battle-field of Cedar MountainFrontispiece Headquarters of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Brook Farm13 Camp of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Brook Farm23 Camp of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Cantonment Hicks, near Frederick, Maryland88 The Battle of Kernstown125 Trace of the Routes pursued by Generals Jackson and Ewell from Swift Run Gap, in their combined Operations against Banks182 The Battle of MacDowell182 The Battle-field of Cedar (or Slaughter) Mountain308
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
the vision pictured by Scott of the clans of Rhoderick Dhu:--The wind's last breath had tossed in air Pennon and plaid and plumage fair; The next but swept a lone hill-side Where heath and fern were waving wide; The sun's last gleam had glinted back From spear and glaive, from targe and jack; The next all unreflected shone On bracken green and cold gray stone. At five o'clock in the morning, on the eleventh of July, the regiment forded for the first time the Potomac, at Williamsport in Maryland, and entered upon the sacred soil of Virginia. Its destination was Martinsburg, the headquarters of General Patterson, to whom, as ordered by General Scott, I was to report. Never again was the Second to make that march in such style. The officers were in full uniform, adorned with epaulettes and sashes. The ranks were full, a thousand men, marching in close order, moving with the military precision of veterans, and keeping time to the music of a full band, which echoed through the s
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
arper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomao cross the Potomac, and take up positions in Maryland. With an addition to my command of twenty cacommand, were ordered to cross the river into Maryland, and take position on the western face of thethe offensive in Virginia to the defensive in Maryland wrought another change, which our enemies appsonal responsibility upon me; but this was in Maryland, at Sandy Hook. Colonel Gordon, Dr., the biler move for its protection and the defence of Maryland. Hardly had I withdrawn my artillery from effect. He was carried across the river into Maryland, as narrated, and we had passed the house whihe time his body was lying stark and stiff in Maryland! The demonstration from Edward's Ferry by re, about three miles from Frederick City, in Maryland, turn to the left and follow for a few rods aof his brigade, in honor of Governor Hicks of Maryland, became our winter quarters. By the last o
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
been threatened by the enemy's cavalry, and had asked for reinforcements, which were not furnished. Between twelve and one o'clock A. M., of the 7th, a frightened teamster came flying from camp to Banks's headquarters, crying out that the loyal Maryland regiment had been cut to pieces. Twelve hundred cavalry, he said, had attacked it. My route for a short distance led along a good paved road; but soon turning to the left, upon a dirt road, the mud and obstructions rendered it impossible to , First Virginia; Clark's Battery E, Fourth Artillery; Davis's Battery B, First Virginia; Robinson's Battery L, First Ohio; Huntington's Battery H, First Ohio. Broadhead's Cavalry,four companies First Michigan; two companies Ohio; two companies Maryland; six companies First Virginia; two companies Ringgold and Washington cavalry. numbered in infantry 6,000, and in cavalry 750. There were also twenty-four pieces of artillery, and one company of Massachusetts sharp-shooters. The battle of Ke
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 5: return to Strasburg (continued)—Banks's flight to WinchesterBattle of Winchester. (search)
emy advanced cautiously, and were received with shells from Knapp's Battery. With a grim humor Jackson selected a Rebel Maryland regiment Colonel Bradley T. Johnson's. to attack the loyal Marylanders. Supported by cavalry, who in turn were sustach odds there was no hope. Setting fire to his camp, Kenly retreated to the first bridge, closely followed by the Rebel Maryland, the Louisiana battalions, and the cavalry. Here a stand was made, but without avail; for the enemy in overwhelming numngs, but in vain. Artillery and cavalry were mingled together, sabres waved over the heads of the doomed loyalists from Maryland, and the word Surrender! passed from every mouth. It was finished. Save an insignificant number of men, and one piecehen an unexpected visitor was brought before me. It was one of Jackson's medical officers, a surgeon attached to a Rebel Maryland battery. While more than half drunk, probably on our liquor found in the captured wagons, the noncombatant surgeon stum
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
d, 155; missing, 711, -total, 904. He thinks the number killed and wounded may be larger than this, while many missing may return, but that the aggregate will not be changed. To our own force, as enumerated, should be added five companies of Maryland cavalry that were stationed at Winchester. The loss of the Confederates is given in Jackson's report as 68 killed, 329 wounded, and 3 missing. But to these Allan thinks about 40 should be added, to include Ashby's loss, and that in the Louisiannt Royal, to which place my command had moved from Bartonsville, I shook the dust of Washington from my feet, not to return to it again for two months, when, as part of a wrecked and broken army, we made our way across the Potomac to fight under McClellan at Antietam, for the safety of Maryland and the North. Before leaving Washington, I enlightened the Committee on the Conduct of the War upon the subject of Union guards over enemy's property, upon which political soldiers were much exercised.