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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 6 document sections:

George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
to a requisition from the President of the United States to aid in the maintenance of the laws and on the requisition of the President of the United States, to be marched out of the limits of the St with higher powers. The President of the United States,--could I obtain his promise to accept thigiment of infantry to the President of the United States. Later in the day I found myself so crowde third of May, 1861, the President of the United States proclaimed that he would receive thirty-nint I have ever known in the service of the United States, regular or volunteer. For promptness in ve, too, of the date of muster — in to the United States service, for, at the especial suggestion o the Second Regiment was mustered into the United States service prior to any other colonel from tegimental officers into the service of the United States, should never be earlier than the date of tates, as it was the first accepted by the United States. I have said there were exceptions, two[5 more...]
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
with the Second as a garrison, a daily paper received on the twenty-fifth of July announced that the President of the United States had raised Mr. N. P. Banks, late of Massachusetts, from a private citizen to the rank of a Major-General of Volunteerwas President. On the seventh of October, in observance of a day of fasting and prayer which the President of the United States had suggested, the whole division moved to a field, where, formed in close columns of battalions, they stood with uncted. The twenty-second day of February, Abraham Lincoln, as Constitutional commander of the Armies and Navies of the United States, appointed for General McClellan to move against the enemy. The President ordered it; and now, exulting in our prospects, we celebrated the birthday of Washington throughout the United States with joy: we cheered for the victory that had followed victory. The hope that cheered us, we trusted, brought despair to our foe; the clouds were breaking away, and at last
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
ts on the twenty-third of February. McClellan was placed at the head of the Army of the Potomac, and soon ceased to be commander-in-chief of the armies of the United States. It was very early in the morning of the twenty-seventh of February, 1862, when I marched with my regiment through the streets of Frederick, in Maryland, toes, especially with the lower classes; but when they found it was that or nothing, they took them eagerly. The thin, flimsy-looking currency, issued by the Confederate States, as well as by their municipal corporations, was exchanged among their own people with confidence in its value, although I observed that the knowing ones uscking the door and flying to the bedroom in the upper story, as I entered with the regiment. Notwithstanding she had heard that I had the best regiment in the United States service, and the best disciplined, she was alarmed, she said; but she would be gratified if I would take a bed in her house,--which I declined, and slept in ca
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
ng that tended to a result. On the eighth of May, returning from the mountain, we again pitched our tents in New Market. I do not recall more sleepy and dreamy hours than for a few days were passed there while awaiting the order to return to Strasburg. The official report of the evacuation by the enemy of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., we received on Sunday the eleventh of May, the anniversary of the day on which the Second Massachusetts Regiment was mustered into the service of the United States for three years or the war. New Orleans, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Yorktown had been snatched from Rebel grasp, and we counted as surely upon Richmond to follow; so in noisy demonstrations with the bands we celebrated our anniversary, saddened by the reflection that to us had fallen only the task of holding Strasburg for the protection of the valley. On the thirteenth of May Williams's division re-entered Strasburg. The roads, the bridges, the scenes, and the people were little cha
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
resident as one of the reasons After Copeland's dismissal from the army, in August, 1862, he sought an interview with Abraham Lincoln, the President of the United States, at which the following occurred :-- The President replied, Well, sir, I know something about your case, and I'll tell you what I know. You're the man whoork sent her Eleventh Regiment of State Militia. It arrived at Harper's Ferry on the thirtieth of May; but the men refused to be sworn into the service of the United States unless they could dictate terms, which were, that they should go to Washington and be placed in a camp of instruction. These being rejected by officers of the861 it came to my knowledge that the congressional delegation from Massachusetts had recommended my promotion to a brigadier-generalslip. The President of the United States in a personal interview informed me that the reason why he did not heed this recommendation was because the Governor of your State protests against it. Mr. Li
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 7: the Army of Virginia under General PopeBattle of Cedar Mountain. (search)
ny facts that form the groundwork of the history of that period, that McClellan's refusal to correspond with Pope, or to unite with him in the execution of his plans, caused the former's removal from the chief command of all the armies of the United States, and the substitution of General Halleck as commander-in-chief. The strength of the three corps commanded by Pope was as follows: Siegel's corps was reported as 11,500 strong; Bank's corps as 14,500, although in reality it numbered only abidly forward from West. Copeland's Statement, p. 23. was sent, and Copeland's doom was sealed. Within a few days, while preparing to sail from New York for the Southern Department, he read in a New York paper that he was dismissed from the United States service. The only reasons for this ever given him by the President were founded upon the proclamation and despatch. Continued the President, I don't know what the charges are; but I do know that you sent a most improper and malicious tele