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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 65 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 63 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 55 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 43 1 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Preface. (search)
ed, The Army of Virginia and A War Diary of events in the great Rebellion, continue, with the present volume, my history in chronological order to the end of the war. ond Massachusetts Infantry at the house, the camp and the evening parade, on the fields of the old historic Brook Farm at West Roxbury, are taken from large sketches of house, camp, and field, made on the ground by a private soldier of the Regiment during our occupancy in the spring of 1861. The winter encampment near Frederick, in Maryland, in 1861-1862, is a reproduction of a sketch made by a German artist while we were in camp there. The reports of officers are taken, some from originals in my possession, some from Moore's Rebellion Record, and others from the Official Records of the Union and Confederate armies, published pursuant to an Act of Congress, approved June 16, 1880. A large number of papers, contemporaneous with the facts and incidents treated in this volume, carefully preserved and filed away at th
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, List of maps and illustrations. (search)
List of maps and illustrations. Map showing the Movements of the Federal and Confederate Armies in the Shenandoah Valley, in Maryland, and in the Region of the Battle-field of Cedar MountainFrontispiece Headquarters of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Brook Farm13 Camp of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Brook Farm23 Camp of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry at Cantonment Hicks, near Frederick, Maryland88 The Battle of Kernstown125 Trace of the Routes pursued by Generals Jackson and Ewell from Swift Run Gap, in their combined Operations against Banks182 The Battle of MacDowell182 The Battle-field of Cedar (or Slaughter) Mountain308
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. After our defeat at Manassas came the creation of the Army of the Potomac. I shall touch briefly in this chapter upon the trials which resulted in the formation of that well-disciplined army, only hinting at the magnitude of the task to which General McClellan devoted himself with a soldier's experience and a magnetic power. While I occupieble relations than it had efficacy in impressing upon General-Banks the conviction that he was acting the r6le of a general in command, for under date of the thirty-first of December I find a note from him, addressing me from headquarters, Frederick, Maryland, as My dear sir, and continuing, If not any interference with arrangements for your regiment to-morrow, I should esteem it a favor if you would allow your band to visit my headquarters for a couple of hours, say from eleven to one o'clock;
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
national stocks, and a possible if not probable foreign intervention. The President's Order No. 1, issued against McClellan's protest, peremptorily commanded an advance at all points on the twenty-third of February. McClellan was placed at the head of the Army of the Potomac, and soon ceased to be commander-in-chief of the armies of the United States. It was very early in the morning of the twenty-seventh of February, 1862, when I marched with my regiment through the streets of Frederick, in Maryland, to take the cars for Harper's Ferry. As the band aroused the town, young ladies, hurriedly dressed, waved handkerchiefs from windows and, in some cases with tears ill repressed, uttered a trembling good-by. Though their hearts were full of anticipations, hopeful and fearful, their heroism was magnificent. While there was solicitude for suffering that must come, there was no flinching. I saw a sister sending a brother to fight against her husband; a father armed to fight against
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
l Gordon, 32-34. Its first engagement and incidents of, 38. Leaves Harper's Ferry and occupies Darnstown, Md., 48, 49 et seg. A case of discipline in, 50-53. Observes day of .fasting and prayer appointed by the President, 58. Impatient waiting of its officers and men for active service, 61, 62, 173. Ordered to Conrad's Ferry, 62-64. In camp, at Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek, 81-86 ; at which place it experiences a hurricane, 83, -and also much sickness, 84-86. In winter quarters at Frederick, Md., 87 et seq. Incidents and scenes of camp-life, 88, 89, 91, 107, 108, 149-151. A second time at Harper's Ferry, 102,--and thence to Charlestown, Va, 104, etseq. Foraging in, 104, 118, 119. Marches to Winchester, 116, 117. United to a new brigade, General Gordon as commander, 120. Pursues Stonewall Jackson, 134 et seq. In camp at Edenburg, 136,--and skirmishing there, 136-139. Its further pursuit of Jackson, 151 et seq. An officer of, finds time in camp to fall in love, 166. Forms pa