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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana. You can also browse the collection for McIntosh or search for McIntosh in all documents.

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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 21: administration of War Department (search)
wisely concluded that it was only necessary for him to say, Go in! The battle of the Opequan, or Winchester, was fought, and on the receipt of the news at Washington, September 21st, Dana wrote to me in enthusiastic terms as follows: A thousand cheers for the great victory won by the Army of the Shenandoah! It is an event whose importance is not to be measured by the immediate results of the battle. It is like the battle of Chattanooga in its far-reaching consequence. I am sorry McIntosh has had such bad luck. This gallant brigade commander lost a leg in the battle. As for General Smith's proposition, I am in doubt. Four weeks ago Gillmore went to City Point after the same thing, and got a pretty decisive cold shoulder. Some officer is to have it, but I don't know who it is, and, since Rawlins and Bowers are both absent, there's nobody I can write to. I should like much to have it given to Smith. Perhaps I will write to the general. Rawlins is getting well. Dr
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 22: beginning of a New era (search)
the regular army would be increased to perhaps fifty thousand men, to be made up by retaining a sufficient number of the colored troops, and that the feeling was at that time against Washburne's bill to revive the grade of general, mainly because it was supposed that men who did not know General Grant as we did would think that the general himself was at the bottom of it. In the same letter he expressed his hearty approval of retaining such officers as Sickles, Robinson, T. W. Sherman, and McIntosh in the service till some other provision could be made for them, because each had lost a leg in battle. Shortly after his return to Chicago, he acknowledged the receipt of a letter from me written at Richmond, intimating that while in Washington a few days before I had discovered signs of a change of feeling towards him at General Grant's headquarters. This appeared to give him great concern, as it made him think there might be much less sense there than he would like to believe. He ad
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
8. Louis Philippe, 62, 64. Louisville, 254, 276, 277, 301, 366. Lovejoy, Owen, 101. Lowell, poet, 51; Colonel, 336. Lyford, Stephen D., 302. Lynchburg, 330, 331. M. McClellan, General, 170, 178, 188, 189, 310, 343, 350, 474. McClernand, General, 199, 200, 210, 211,218,219,221-223,226-228, 236, 238, 245. McCook, General, 261, 262, 265, 336. McClure's Magazine, 239. Macdaniel family, 45, 51, 57. McDowell, General, 166. Macfeeley, Lieutenant--Colonel, 242. McIntosh, General, 344, 373. McKinley, bill, 475; William, 293, 492. McMichael, Morton, 62. Macon, 343, 355, 361. McPherson, General, 222, 223, 227, 244-246, 251. Macready riots, 97. Manassas, 172. Manifest Destiny, 125,133, 402. Marat, President French Assembly, 78, 88. March to the Sea, 300, 355. Marriage of Dana, 58. Marti, Jose, tribute to, 498. Mason, Senator, 153. Maximilian, 398. Maynard, Horace, 288. Maynardier, Major, 351. Mazzini, 497. Meade, General, 2