Browsing named entities in John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana. You can also browse the collection for Fitz-Henry Warren or search for Fitz-Henry Warren in all documents.

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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 10: last days with the tribune (search)
with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constant reiteration in the columns of the Tribune. It is also certain that when disaster overtook the national army, Greeley made haste to declare, in a letter dated July 23d, filling an entire column of the Tribune, over his own signature: I wish to be distinctly understood as not seeking to be relieved from any responsibility for urging the advance of the
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 11: War between the states (search)
countries of Europe, it was contended that the Federal government could not afford to move till everything was brought to the highest state of efficiency. The numbers, equipment, and warlike spirit of the enemy were greatly exaggerated. Our own people were becoming depressed, and it began to be widely feared that the war for the Union would be a failure. Fully appreciating the danger of the policy which McClellan had inaugurated, Dana showed his dissatisfaction with it by publishing Fitz-Henry Warren's article, Forward to Richmond, and reiterating the cry till Greeley put an end to it, as heretofore described. In the midst of the lethargy which followed, Thomas won the battle of Mill Spring, and shortly afterwards Grant captured Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and the forces defending them. The country was electrified. McClellan's friends made haste to claim that these victories were due to his supervision and generalship, whereas he had but little if anything to do with them. The
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 19: Grant's overland campaign against Richmond (search)
of infantry that had marched all night; Grant's order for Warren to attack them with the support of Sedgwick; the death of any prisoners; the dissatisfaction of Grant and Meade with Warren; the night transfer of Warren and Wright to the left; the Warren and Wright to the left; the rumors of Lee's retirement; the prevalence of rain; the fatigue of the army; the second successful assault by the intrepid Ude were intensely disgusted with the failure of Wright and Warren; and finally that Meade says a radical change must be madele him to perform the part assigned to him, Wright, Smith, Warren, and Hancock had all been engaged and had suffered heavy lr of battle from left to right was Hancock, Wright, Smith, Warren (in single line), with Burnside massed in rear of his righsanguine. Burnside also thought he could get through, but Warren, who was nearest him, did not seem to share this opinion. rted to Stanton, among other things, that two divisions of Warren's corps had taken position to the left of Hancock near Bot
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 20: Confederate operations in Northern Virginia (search)
rriving at headquarters on July 1st. Here he found a condition of affairs far from encouraging. Instead of waiting for Sheridan's return from his movement against the railroads north of Richmond, Grant sent the rest of his cavalry straight out into the Confederacy to break up those leading west and south from Petersburg. Meade had tried to extend his left to cover the highways and railroads, but had failed and settled down supinely on the defensive. He was now engaged in quarrelling with Warren, but would probably settle the matter at issue without proceeding to the extreme remedy of relieving him. Butler was pretty deep in controversial correspondence with Balky Smith, in which it will be noted that Grant says, Butler was clearly in the wrong. Rumors had just come in that the movement against the Danville and Southside railroads had come to grief, while Sheridan had stopped north of the James River to rest. To make matters worse, Grant was losing confidence in Meade, who had th
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
sworth, General, 249. Wakefield, scholar, 20. Walden's Ridge, 277, 279. Waldron, Congressman, 146. Walewski, 66. Walker, filibuster, 126. Walker, Professor, 25, 26. Wallace, General, Lew, 336. Ward, General, Hobart, 319, 329. Warren, Fitz-Henry, Forward to Richmond, 166, 189. Warren, General, 319, 320, 323, 324, 328, 332, 337. Washburne, E. B., 311-313, 399, 407-411. Washburne's bill to make Grant general, 373, 409. Washington, Dana in, 126,131,138 141, 143, 145, 172, 177,Warren, General, 319, 320, 323, 324, 328, 332, 337. Washburne, E. B., 311-313, 399, 407-411. Washburne's bill to make Grant general, 373, 409. Washington, Dana in, 126,131,138 141, 143, 145, 172, 177, 185, 194, 197; recalled to, 200, 225; returns to. 248, 250, 256, 262, 296, 298, 299, 304, 309, 313, 315, 331, 333, 336-339, 341, 342, 345, 347, 358, 361, 366, 367, 373, 493. Washington, George, 129, 349. Washington Ring, 449. Watson, Assistant Secretary of War, 290, 306, 341. Wauhatchie, 254, 283, 284. Wayne, Justice, 419. Webb, Captain, Seth, 13. Webb, General, Watson, 487. Webster, Daniel, 98, 113, 152. Weed, Thurlow, 161. Weitzel. General, 357. Weldon and Lynchburg rail