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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 1: his early years and first employment as a compositor (search)
apprenticeship gave him his first opportunity to share in political discussion, and aid in the work of a campaign. John Quincy Adams was President, Calhoun Vice-President, and Henry Clay Secretary of State when Greeley went to East Poultney, and public feeling was seething over the charge that there had been a corrupt bargain between Adams and Clay. In the national election of 1828 Calhoun was the candidate for Vice-President on the Jackson (Democratic) ticket, and Adams and Rush headed the Adams and Rush headed the National Republican ticket. We Vermonters were all protectionists, wrote Greeley; the Northern Spectator was an Adams paper of the partizan type, and on election day Poultney gave Adams 334 votes and Jackson only 4. Greeley was also greatly interAdams 334 votes and Jackson only 4. Greeley was also greatly interested in the Antimasonry political movement, sympathizing with the opponents of the secret order, and maintaining his opposition to such organizations throughout his life. Diligent student as he was, Horace was not averse to amusements in those d
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 8: during the civil war (search)
x or more of the cotton States wanted to secede, we will do our best to help them out, not that we want them to go, but that we loathe the idea of compelling them to stay. The abstract right of a State to secede, under the Constitution, is upheld by some Republicans of prominence to-day. Without following their argument, it may be pointed out that what Washington had in view was an inviolable Union, that indissoluble Union which he recommended to the Governors of the States; and that John Quincy Adams, in 1828, declared that, while the people of a State, by the primitive right of insurrection against oppression might declare their State out of the Union, they have delegated no such power to their legislators or their judges; and if there be such a right, it is the right of an individual to commit suicide — the right of an inhabitant of a populous city to set fire to his own dwelling house. Greeley's declarations were eagerly accepted by the most radical defenders of secession in