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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 8: during the civil war (search)
Lincoln's patience and kindly treatment of Greeley throughout this episode are admirably set forth in the Nicolay-Hay biography. Realizing the futility of the proposed negotiations, as well as Greeley's honesty of purpose, Lincoln decided to make use of his offer in order to show the country what such negotiations would amount to. So he placed Greeley in the front as negotiator, replying to him as follows: If you can find any person, anywhere, professing to have any proposition of Jefferson Davis in writing, for peace, embracing the restoration of the Union and the abandonment of slavery, whatever else it embraces, say to him that he may come to me with you, under a safe-conduct. This broad acceptance of any authorized peace agent, under Greeley's guidance, puzzled the editor, and he first replied, expressing doubt whether the negotiators would open their budget to him. But very soon afterward he wrote Lincoln again, giving him in confidence the names of the Confederate agents
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 9: Greeley's presidential campaign-his death (search)
s leadership in that cause an opponent of President Johnson bondsman for Jefferson Davis his Richmond speech the Liberal movement in Missouri Forerunnings of thd for the present be resisted and defeated. I did think it desirable that Jefferson Davis should be arraigned and tried for treason; and it still seems to me that tty has ceased to be powerful and dangerous in the Southern States. When Jefferson Davis's counsel, George Shea, an old friend of Greeley, consulted the latter abomirers as he had never incurred. His motives were attacked, his interview with Davis misrepresented, and he was handed over by thousands of Republicans to the compaa special meeting of the Union League Club, to consider his conduct in becoming Davis's bondsman. In reply to an official notification of this meeting, Greeley wrottter, in which he rehearsed his early views about the disposition to be made of Davis, recalled the fact that, soon after their publication, the acceptance of a port
. Crandall, Miss, opposition to her plan for negro education, 132. Curtis, George William, 72. D. Dallas, vote on tariff, 121. Dana, Charles A., 72, 82, 105. Davis, Judge, David, candidate for presidential nomination, 235. Davis, Jefferson, Greeley on, 218, 220-222. Depew, C. M., anecdote of Greeley, 107. De Tocqueville on early American newspapers, 27. Douglas, Stephen A., in the Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163-165; Greeley favors for Senator, 178. Dred Scott decisio2; Niagara Falls negotiations, 203-208; letter to Lincoln, 208; a suppressed editorial, 210, 211; final view of Lincoln, 212, 213; for universal amnesty and impartial suffrage, 217-226; destroys his chance for United States Senator, 218; on Jefferson Davis, 218, 220-222; on President Johnson's course, 219; action of Union League Club, 221, 222; address in Richmond, 223-225; trip to Texas, 225 ; failure as a prophet, 225; signs letter in favor of Liberal movement, 234; candidate before the Libe