hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
e subordinates, and how best to direct their efforts. Among other contributors and editorial assistants to whom the Tribune was indebted were Margaret Fuller, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles ), William Henry Frye, Hildreth, the historian, and Charles T. Congdon. Charles A. Dana joined the staff in 1847,, from the delivery of one not very good lecture, could secure money enough to support himself while he was writing a really good book, and that one course of Bayard Taylor's lectures brought him profit enough to pay his way ten times around the world. Greeley always loved to talk, and the lecture-field was a tempting one to hies. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected t
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 6: the tariff question (search)
mocratic Congress elected with Polk. The new Secretary of the Treasury, Robert J. Walker, of Mississippi, in his first report, strongly favored a lighter tariff, making what was considered an attack on the protection policy; and a bill which bore his name was passed (by the casting vote of Vice-President Dallas in the Senate, and against the vote of every Representative but one from Pennsylvania) which divided dutiable articles into classes, those in Schedule C, for instance, which included most products over which there was a special controversy, to pay a duty of 30 per cent on their value; the tariff of 1842 provided that iron, in this schedule, should pay so many dollars per ton. In 1846, Pennsylvania, in an off year, chose sixteen Whigs out of her nineteen Representatives in Congress, and the Whigs made encouraging gains in other important States. Greeley strongly favored the nomination of Clay again in 1848, and another tariff campaign, but the convention named General Taylor.
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 7: Greeley's part in the antislavery contest (search)
holder the Tribune's position stated Disgust over Taylor's nomination defiance of the business interests ofwn. The convention had given the nomination to General Taylor, and had laid on the table and refused to vote reeley had stated in advance his objections to General Taylor--the fact that his views on public questions we. If it shall appear to us that the support of General Taylor is the only course by which the election of Casd on July 31 the Tribune restated its objections to Taylor, and refused to come out for him until the Buffalo ntion and the August elections made it certain that Taylor or Cass must be chosen. On June 27 a Taylor ratifi 27 he confessed his belief that only by supporting Taylor could Cass be defeated, and the Taylor ticket appeawas not already authorized. In January, 1850, President Taylor recommended to Congress the admission of Califthe elevation of Fillmore to the presidency through Taylor's death, and after that Congress passed four separa
26, 144, 145; opinions of the Abolitionists, 128, 129, 135, 136, 143, 156, 178; the Tribune's influence in the slavery contest, 133; early views on slavery, 134-136; on the murder of Lovejoy, 136; on Texas annexation, 137-148; listless support of Taylor, 148-151; defiance of New York business interests, 149-151, 161, 162; opposition to slavery in Congress, 151; Compromise of 1850, 151-163; reply to Calhoun, 154; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; abandons Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slan, 115-118; Clay campaign of 1844, 119, 120; Polk's position, 121; R. J. Walker's views, 121; tariff vs. slavery, 161; part in the Liberal Republican campaign of 1872,232-234; Liberal Republican plank, 240; Greeley's acceptance of it, 246. Taylor, Bayard, 72, 96. Taylor, Gen. Z., Greeley's listless support of, 148-151; on admission of California, 157. Temperance, Greeley's views, 18, 172. Texas annexation, 137-148. Tilden, Samuel J., 116. Times, New York, started, 94. Tribune, N