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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders.. You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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ee. Beauregard's line of defence in Northern Virginia. sketch of General Beauregard. his person and manners. his opinion of the Yankee. the army of the Potomac and the army of the Shenandoah. Gen. Johnson's evacuation of Harper's Ferry. Stonewall Jackson's first affair with the enemy. Johnston amusing the enemy. affair of Rich Mountain. McClellan's march into Northwestern Virginia. Rosecrans' capture of the Confederate force on Rich Mountain. retreat of the, Confederates from Laure as were likely to prove most useful to the enemy. The Confederates retired to Winchester, but had scarcely arrived there when information was obtained that the Federals were still advancing; and Gen. Jackson-afterwards known as the immortal Stonewall Jackson — with his brigade, was sent to the neighbourhood of Martinsburg, to aid Stuart's cavalry in destroying what they could of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad stock, and thus check the enemy's movements. On the 2d of July, however, Patters
ff. splendid charge of the Confederates. death of Col. Baker. the enemy driven into the River. an appalling spectacle of death. misrepresentations in Washington. Morale of McClellan's army. the affair at Dranesville. defeat of Stuart, Stonewall Jackson's new command. his expedition from Winchester.Terrible sufferings of his command. his demonstration at Bath. his movement to Romney, and return to Winchester. close of the first year's campaign in Virginia. naval operations in 1861n killed and wounded was about two hundred. The affair of Dranesville was the last conflict of arms of any note that occurred near the Potomac in the first winter of the war. But within this period, we must remark an expedition, conducted by Stonewall Jackson, which was a most extraordinary enterprise, and was attended by such hardships and sufferings as made it a story of terrible interest and fearful romance. In September, Jackson had been made a Major-General, and in the early part of
deral council of war at Fairfax Court-house. shifting of the scenes of war in Virginia. the battle of Kernstown. how Stonewall Jackson came to fight this battle. great numerical superiourity of the enemy. the contest at the Stone fence. Jacksohad in the camps of Centreville and Manassas less than thirty thousand men. These figures are from an official source. Stonewall Jackson had been detached with eleven skeleton regiments to amuse the enemy in the Shenandoah Valley, passing rapidly bnd some cavalry, and commanded, as he states in his official report, seven thousand men of all arms. Ascertaining that Stonewall Jackson was at New Market, he made a feint, pretended to retreat on the 20th of March, and at night placed his force inhe hearts which had so long throbbed with anxiety in its besieged capital. That occasion was the splendid diversion of Stonewall Jackson in the Valley of Virginia. Public attention turned to the eccentric career of that commander to find a new her
al despatches, big falsehoods in big print, and a memorable career of cruelty in Southeastern Missouri. He had suddenly risen into favour at Washington. McDowell, a moderate Democrat, having no sympathy with the Anti-Slavery school of politics — who some months before had been stationed at Fredericksburg, and was promised chief command of the movement thence upon Richmond when joined by Banks, Shields, and Fremont, but whose hopes had been destroyed by the rapid marches and victories of Stonewall Jackson — was humiliated to find his plans and chief command entrusted to an incompetent man, and himself put in an obscure and subordinate position under Pope. Whatever question there may have been of the military capacity of McClellan, it is certain that there were political reasons at Washington for putting him out of the way. He was a Democrat; his constant interpretation of the war had been that it was a contest for the restoration of the Union, not a war of vengeance, and should n
he most brilliant in the military history of the world, and whose character must ever remain an interesting subject for the student of mankind. Character of Stonewall Jackson. There was probably no more ambitious man in the Southern Confederacy than Stonewall Jackson. Tile vulgar mind thinks that it easily discovers those Stonewall Jackson. Tile vulgar mind thinks that it easily discovers those who are the ambitious men in a community. It readily designates as such those who aspire to office and public positions, who seek sensations, court notoriety in newspapers, and hold up their hands for the applause of the multitude. But ambition, in its true and noble sense, is very different from these coarse bids for popular fave commanded by some peripatetic philosophical madman, whose forte was pedestrianism. With little or no baggage, we are a roving, hungry, hardy lot of fellows. Stonewall may be a very fine old gentleman, and an honest, good-tempered, industrious man, but I should admire him much more in a state of rest than continually seeing him