Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Preston S. Brooks or search for Preston S. Brooks in all documents.

Your search returned 60 results in 8 document sections:

charge of Mr. Wilson led to a challenge from Mr. Brooks, which was borne to him by General Lane of O; the majority recommending the expulsion of Mr. Brooks, and expressing disapprobation of the act ofed, at the North. Referring to a meeting of Brooks's constituents, at which resolutions of approvThe Richmond Examiner said: Far from blaming Mr. Brooks, we are disposed to regard him as a conservaed whether he would receive a challenge from Mr. Brooks. He, however, declined to receive it. L nothing and retracting nothing. Of course, Brooks took action at once, and sent a challenge by Geast of the Capitol. He then expected to meet Brooks outside of the District the next morning. He He then, at that hour, supposed he should meet Brooks early the next morning; and he confided to hisd fall. At parting he remarked: I do not hate Brooks, but I shall kill him. Mr. Campbell, who wrthe junction in Maryland, for that place. But Brooks declined to meet Burlingame at the place desig[20 more...]
public mind, to produce a profound impression. Men whose course had been subjected to this terrible arraignment were excited to madness; and summary vengeance was agreed upon as the only remedy that would meet the exigency of the hour. Preston S. Brooks, a Representative from South Carolina, either volunteered or was selected as the agent for its infliction. After the adjournment of the Senate on the 22d of May, Mr. Sumner remained at his desk engaged in writing. While so engaged, BrooksBrooks, whom he did not know, approached him and said: I have read your speech twice over, carefully. It is a libel on South Carolina and Mr. Butler, who is a relative of mine. While these words were passing from his lips he commenced a series of blows with a bludgeon upon the Senator's head, by which the latter was stunned, disabled and smitten down, bleeding and insensible, on the floor of the chamber. From that floor he was taken by friends, borne to the ante-room, where his wounds were dressed,
has since lost much of its special significance, looked at by the side of the more horrible demonstrations of rebellion and civil war. Thus considered, it shows Mr. Brooks as only a fit representative of the dominating influences of the slaveholding States, where not only did their leading public men and presses indorse the deed awhat was to happen. Mr. Toombs said: As for rendering Mr. Sumner any assistance, I did not do it. As to what was said, some gentleman present condemned it in Mr. Brooks. I stated to him, or to some of my own friends, probably, that I approved it. That is my opinion. It was also given in evidence that Mr. Keitt was present at ion You are a liar! from Mr. Butler; although, at the request of Senators, he immediately withdrew the words. The charge of Mr. Wilson led to a challenge from Mr. Brooks, which was borne to him by General Lane of Oregon, afterward Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency. Mr. Wilson, against the urgent advice of Mr. Gidding
LV. The House committee made two reports; the majority recommending the expulsion of Mr. Brooks, and expressing disapprobation of the act of Henry A. Edmonson and Lawrence M. Keitt. The minority, pleading want of jurisdiction, gave sixty-six votes for the minority report. The House censured Keitt, but failed to condemn Edmonson. Keitt resigned. One hundred and twenty-one members voted to expel Brooks and ninety-five voted against expulsion. Having failed to expel —a two-thirds vote being necessary—a vote of censure was adopted by a large majority. After these votes were declared, Mr. Brooks addressed the House in a speech of mingled assumptiMr. Brooks addressed the House in a speech of mingled assumption, insolence and self-conceit. While disclaiming all intention to insult Congress, the Senate or the State of Massachusetts, he seemed to be utterly oblivious that there had been any infringement of law or the rights of others; it being simply, he said, a personal affair, for which I am personally responsible. With infinite eff
The language of Slidell, Douglas, Toombs and Brooks, was evidently spoken in hot blood, and the votes of Mr. Brooks's constituents were cast in obedience to feelings that had been roused to the highed, at the North. Referring to a meeting of Brooks's constituents, at which resolutions of approvproval and sanction will be held not only in Mr. Brooks's district, but throughout the State at largThe Richmond Examiner said: Far from blaming Mr. Brooks, we are disposed to regard him as a conservahe press of the South applaud the conduct of Mr. Brooks, without condition or limitation. Our approtation to attend a public dinner in honor of Mr. Brooks, after referring to his social and politicala representative body; and added that though Mr. Brooks was inconsiderate, * * * Senator Butler was t to have been another, and that one for Preston S. Brooks. * * * So shall the scene in the Senate rrogated whether he would receive a challenge from Mr. Brooks. He, however, declined to receive it.
se things. This language gave no little offence to Brooks and his friends, but they took no action concerning it. Brooks felt compelled, however, to notice Burlingame's speech. Several days after its delivery, Willirolina and Thomas S. Bocock of Virginia, acting for Brooks, met in consultation with Speaker Banks and George the consultation expressed his personal regard for Brooks, but condemned the act committed by him. This nice lding nothing and retracting nothing. Of course, Brooks took action at once, and sent a challenge by Gen. Junds east of the Capitol. He then expected to meet Brooks outside of the District the next morning. He spokell. He then, at that hour, supposed he should meet Brooks early the next morning; and he confided to his collshould fall. At parting he remarked: I do not hate Brooks, but I shall kill him. Mr. Campbell, who wrote t, at the junction in Maryland, for that place. But Brooks declined to meet Burlingame at the place designated
he sequel was more tragic, and, to the thoughtful, far more impressive and replete with its lessons of wisdom and warning. Of the three prominent actors, the most audacious, arrogant, insulting, and, for the time being, seemingly most potential, Brooks and Butler, were in their graves in less than a year; while Keitt died fighting in a war which destroyed the slave system and swept it from the land. Brooks died suddenly, but not until he had confessed to his friend, James L. Orr, that he was tBrooks died suddenly, but not until he had confessed to his friend, James L. Orr, that he was tired of the new role he had chosen, and heart-sick of being the recognized representative of bullies, the recipient of their ostentatious gifts and officious testimonials of admiration and regard. Nor were all its lessons exhausted at the South. At the North the subsequent developments were equally significant and sad. For, notwithstanding the brutality of the outrage and its unequivocal indorsement by the South, a fact fully recognized and properly condemned by those public demonstrations a
Lx. The opinion of Europe concerning Mr. Sumner was all one way. There, his high character and public services were fully understood. There was no Pro-Slavery party in Europe, outside of Spain; nor throughout the whole civilized world, beyond the limits of the United States, did Mr. Brooks find an apologist. No act in the barbarous record of Slavery, nor all of them put together, had done so much to alienate mankind from it and its brazen champions. And when at last the Southern States seceded, and the Confederacy turned its eyes abroad for recognition and sympathy, it met with disdain and contempt from every nation and every class in the Old World, except the Cotton Kings and the Aristocracy of Great Britain. The ruling classes of England, to some extent, did sympathize with the Southern Rebellion, as they had from the hour of the Declaration of Independence greeted with friendly recognition every harbinger of evil to the rising Republic of the West. These classes had built