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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
unded by republican institutions, the charter then promulgated repeated this phrase. In its first article it declared, that Frenchmen are equal before the law, whatever may may be their titles or ranks. While recognizing this peculiar enunciation of the Equality of men, as more specific and satisfactory than the naked statement that all men are borne equal, it is impossible not to be reminded that this form of speech finds its prototype in the ancient Greek language. In the history of Herodotus, we are told that the government of the many has the most beautiful name of i>sonomi/a—or Equality before the law. (Book 3, § 80.) Thus this remarkable language, by its comprehensiveness and flexibility, in an age when Equality before the law was practically unknown, nevertheless supplied a single word, which is not to be found in modern tongues, to express an idea which has been practically recognized only in modern times. Such a word in our own language, as a substitute for Equality, m
unded by republican institutions, the charter then promulgated repeated this phrase. In its first article it declared, that Frenchmen are equal before the law, whatever may may be their titles or ranks. While recognizing this peculiar enunciation of the Equality of men, as more specific and satisfactory than the naked statement that all men are borne equal, it is impossible not to be reminded that this form of speech finds its prototype in the ancient Greek language. In the history of Herodotus, we are told that the government of the many has the most beautiful name of i>sonomi/a—or Equality before the law. (Book 3, § 80.) Thus this remarkable language, by its comprehensiveness and flexibility, in an age when Equality before the law was practically unknown, nevertheless supplied a single word, which is not to be found in modern tongues, to express an idea which has been practically recognized only in modern times. Such a word in our own language, as a substitute for Equality, m