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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section tenth: downfall of the Rebellion. (search)
either by National or State authority; also on juries in all courts, both National and State. It subjects any one violating, or inciting to violation of its provisions, to payment of $500 to the person aggrieved, and imprisonment, and a further fine of from $500 to $1,000. When the violation is committed by a corporation, the penalty to be forfeiture of charter. He introduced substantially the same Bill on the 20th of January, 1871,—the one which he commended so earnestly to his friend Judge Hoar, with almost his dying breath. Xv. In the debate on the Amnesty Bill,—December 20th, 1871,—he used the following language on justice to the Colored race everywhere: We have all heard of the old saying, Let us be just before we are generous. I do not like to be against anything that may seem to be generous; but I do insist always upon justice; and now that it is proposed to be generous to those who were engaged in the rebellion, I insist upon justice to the Colored race everywher<
on the subject unnecessary. It declares all citizens of the United States, without distinction of race and color, entitled to equal and impartial enjoyment of accommodation, advantage, facility or privilege afforded by common carriers on railroads, steamboats, or other public conveyance; in hotels, licensed theatres and other houses of public entertainment; common schools and other institutions of learning authorized by law; church institutions, incorporated either by National or State authority; also on juries in all courts, both National and State. It subjects any one violating, or inciting to violation of its provisions, to payment of $500 to the person aggrieved, and imprisonment, and a further fine of from $500 to $1,000. When the violation is committed by a corporation, the penalty to be forfeiture of charter. He introduced substantially the same Bill on the 20th of January, 1871,—the one which he commended so earnestly to his friend Judge Hoar, with almost his dying breat
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
expired were his physicians, Senator Schurz, Judge Hoar, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Downing. tor's bed-chamber were Senator Schurz, Judge E. Rockwood Hoar, Mr. Pierce, and Mr. Hooper. To thon slavery and the conflict engendered. When Judge Hoar entered the Senator's room at 10 o'clock, thn the Civil Rights Bill; and then turning to Judge Hoar, who was holding his hand, he said, Judge, tn't let it be lost. Upon each appearance of Judge Hoar after that, the Senator said something aboutis secretary, supposing that the presence of Judge Hoar called this to his mind and disturbed him, s Towards the close of the eventful scene, Judge Hoar came into the room, when the Senator again called attention to the bill, whereupon Judge Hoar promised him that it should not be lost, at the sabout ten minutes before his death, he called Judge Hoar and said: Tell Emerson I love and revere s Buffinton, Henry L. Dawes, George F. Hoar, E. R. Hoar, Henry L. Pierce, B. W. Harris, Samuel Hoope
ator expired were his physicians, Senator Schurz, Judge Hoar, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Downing. The Senator's bed-chamber were Senator Schurz, Judge E. Rockwood Hoar, Mr. Pierce, and Mr. Hooper. To those arerican slavery and the conflict engendered. When Judge Hoar entered the Senator's room at 10 o'clock, this moI mean the Civil Rights Bill; and then turning to Judge Hoar, who was holding his hand, he said, Judge, the Cil; don't let it be lost. Upon each appearance of Judge Hoar after that, the Senator said something about the til his secretary, supposing that the presence of Judge Hoar called this to his mind and disturbed him, suggesdraw. Towards the close of the eventful scene, Judge Hoar came into the room, when the Senator again called attention to the bill, whereupon Judge Hoar promised him that it should not be lost, at the same time kissingd. About ten minutes before his death, he called Judge Hoar and said: Tell Emerson I love and revere him.
C. Cowdin,—a committee appointed to attend the funeral by the New York Chamber of Commerce. The party then comprised Senator Anthony, Carl Schurz, Gen. B. F. Butler, James G. Blaine, J. M. S. Williams, Daniel W. Gooch, Aaron A. Sargent, John Sherman, Richard J. Oglesby, Augustus S. Merriman, Stephen A. Hurlbut, Eugene Hale, Charles Foster, Joseph H. Rainey, Charles Clayton, Henry J. Scudder, Samuel J. Randall, Joseph B. Beck, John Hancock, James Buffinton, Henry L. Dawes, George F. Hoar, E. R. Hoar, Henry L. Pierce, B. W. Harris, Samuel Hooper, Alvah Crocker and Mr. George M. Downing, President of the Civil Rights Council in Washington. The casket rested in the centre of a baggage-car, draped in black and white, and was under the charge of Sergeant-at-Arms French, assisted by the Chief of the Capitol Police, with six men. It was what has been called a State casket, composed of rosewood covered with black broadcloth and very heavily mounted with silver. A drapery of black covered th