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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 53 9 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 50 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for James or search for James in all documents.

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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ible to all. But nothing effectual was done about it till 1866, when the bill was passed. The revision and consolidation were to be completed within three years; but the work was neglected, although the salaries were drawn by Caleb Cushing, Mr. James, of Ohio, and Mr. Johnston, of Pennsylvania. In 1870, a supplementary Act was passed, and President Grant reappointed Mr. James, and associated with him Mr. Abbott, of New York, and Mr. Barringer, of North Carolina. Xxi. To the disgrace Mr. James, and associated with him Mr. Abbott, of New York, and Mr. Barringer, of North Carolina. Xxi. To the disgrace of the Republic, three quarters of a century went by after the adoption of the Constitution, before a colored man was allowed to take out a patent in this country! Mr. Sumner introduced the following resolution: That the Committee on Patents and the Patent Office be instructed to consider if any further legislation is necessary in order to secure to persons of African descent, in our own country, the right to take out patents, for useful inventions, under the Constitution of the United Sta
s text, and making it accessible to all. But nothing effectual was done about it till 1866, when the bill was passed. The revision and consolidation were to be completed within three years; but the work was neglected, although the salaries were drawn by Caleb Cushing, Mr. James, of Ohio, and Mr. Johnston, of Pennsylvania. In 1870, a supplementary Act was passed, and President Grant reappointed Mr. James, and associated with him Mr. Abbott, of New York, and Mr. Barringer, of North Carolina.s text, and making it accessible to all. But nothing effectual was done about it till 1866, when the bill was passed. The revision and consolidation were to be completed within three years; but the work was neglected, although the salaries were drawn by Caleb Cushing, Mr. James, of Ohio, and Mr. Johnston, of Pennsylvania. In 1870, a supplementary Act was passed, and President Grant reappointed Mr. James, and associated with him Mr. Abbott, of New York, and Mr. Barringer, of North Carolina.
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
usands as they slowly made their way to the various places of worship, thought of departed worth and genius rather than of the glories of the natural world. In almost every pulpit of the city, words were spoken in eulogy of Mr. Sumner. This volume could not contain them all. The pulpit of the Church of the Disciples was tastefully draped in purple—in this case, more than royal mourning,—and on the table stood a bust of Sumner. Not venturing to speak at length, the address of the pastor, James freeman Clarke, was read. From it we take a few passages: The friends who have fought by his side during long years when success seemed hopeless, whose little barques have sailed attendant on his and partaken the same gales; younger men who have chosen him for their leader, and amid the thick of battle pressed on where they saw his white plume waving, now clasp hands in silent sympathy. The colored people, whose hearts are always right, though their heads are often wrong, now recognize
usands as they slowly made their way to the various places of worship, thought of departed worth and genius rather than of the glories of the natural world. In almost every pulpit of the city, words were spoken in eulogy of Mr. Sumner. This volume could not contain them all. The pulpit of the Church of the Disciples was tastefully draped in purple—in this case, more than royal mourning,—and on the table stood a bust of Sumner. Not venturing to speak at length, the address of the pastor, James freeman Clarke, was read. From it we take a few passages: The friends who have fought by his side during long years when success seemed hopeless, whose little barques have sailed attendant on his and partaken the same gales; younger men who have chosen him for their leader, and amid the thick of battle pressed on where they saw his white plume waving, now clasp hands in silent sympathy. The colored people, whose hearts are always right, though their heads are often wrong, now recognize