Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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iness. And now, sir, by practical services here in Washington, rendered at the call of his country, he has earned, it seems to me, this small appropriation—not as a charity to his desolate widow, but as a compensation for labor done. I hope the amendment will be agreed to. Xxv. On his return to Boston, after the memorable session of 1851-2, the warmest welcome was extended to him from every quarter. In addressing the State Convention of the Free-Soil Party of Massachusetts, held at Lowell, on the 16th of September, 1852, he delivered one of his most striking speeches, some portions of which we reproduce. It was on the eve of the national election. Mr. President and fellow-citizens of Massachusetts:—I should be dull indeed were I insensible to this generous, overflowing, heart-speaking welcome. After an absence of many months, I have now come home, to breathe anew the invigorating Northern air, to tread again the free soil of our native Massachusetts, and to enjoy the sym
Xxv. On his return to Boston, after the memorable session of 1851-2, the warmest welcome was extended to him from every quarter. In addressing the State Convention of the Free-Soil Party of Massachusetts, held at Lowell, on the 16th of September, 1852, he delivered one of his most striking speeches, some portions of which we reproduce. It was on the eve of the national election. Mr. President and fellow-citizens of Massachusetts:—I should be dull indeed were I insensible to this generous, overflowing, heart-speaking welcome. After an absence of many months, I have now come home, to breathe anew the invigorating Northern air, to tread again the free soil of our native Massachusetts, and to enjoy the sympathy of friends and fellow-citizens. But, while glad in your greetings, thus bounteously lavished, I cannot accept them for myself. I do not deserve them. They belong to the cause which we all have at heart, and which binds us together. Against Freedom both the old parti