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Browsing named entities in The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman). You can also browse the collection for Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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re. Among its earliest productions were Peirce's New England Almanack, and the Bay Psalm Book, and there was afterward printed that monument of labor, Eliot's Indian Bible. The complaints of insufficient land led to extensive grants of territory, until from 1644 to 1655 Cambridge attained enormous dimensions, including the whole areas of Brighton and Newton on the south side of the river, and on the other hand in a northwesterly direction the whole or large parts of Arlington, Lexington, Bedford, and Billerica. In 1655, this vast area was first curtailed by cutting off the parts beyond Lexington. Then in 1688, Newton, which had been known as Cambridge Village and sometimes as New Cambridge, became an independent township under name of Newtown. The Lexington area was known as Cambridge Farms, but the founding of a church there in 1696 was the preliminary to separation, and in 1713 Cambridge Farms became a distinct town by the name of Lexington. In 1754, the boundary between C
Real-estate interests of Cambridge. Leander M. Hannum. If we recall the fact that soon after the first settlement of Cambridge, in the spring of 1631, it embraced a territory thirty-five miles in length, including the towns of Billerica, Bedford, Lexington, Arlington, Brighton, and Newton, we shall see that our area has greatly decreased, as the extreme length of our present territory is only four miles, and the total area about four thousand acres, in spite of the fact that by legislative acts of 1855 and 1880, portions of Watertown and Belmont were granted to Cambridge. It exalts our estimate of the earlier commercial importance of our city when we read that by an act of Congress approved January 11, 1805, it was enacted that Cambridge should be a port of delivery, and subject to the same regulations as other ports of delivery in the United States. The custom-house was never built, yet under the stimulus given to real-estate interests by this act, large tracts of land on