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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
atagem of the ladies present. See, also, p. 1 of Boston Commonwealth, Oct. 23, 1880. Unable to remain in New York, whither on the 12th he accompanied Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Child despite the remonstrances of his friends, his first test of the New England temper after the signal had been given from Faneuil Hall proved how much it had changed for the worse towards himself. The attack on him at Concord (N. H.), on September 4, followed close upon the mobbing of Mr. May at Haverhill, Mass.; on September 17, the Brighton-Street gallows was set up before his late residence in Boston; on September 27, an Lib. 5.163; May's Recollections, p. 123. extraordinary onslaught was made on him in the rural village of Abington, Mass. At this time, too, a stupid or wilful perversion, by an Andover student from the South, named Kaufman, of Mr. Thompson's remarks in a private discussion on slavery, added fuel to the flames of his persecution. He was accused of having said that the slave masters ought
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
soldiers to employ in self-defence, or for aggressive purposes. If, then, the spirit of Christ dwell in me, how can I resort to those things which he could not adopt? If I belong to his kingdom, what have I to do with the kingdoms of this world? Let the dead bury their dead. . . . I shall leave Brooklyn on Saturday next with my family, Sept. 15, 1838. for Boston, via Providence. If there was preparation on one side, there was counterpreparation on the other. On the evening of September 17 (the day of Mr. Garrison's arrival in Boston), a meeting of moderate peace men was held at the Eagle Bank, to concert measures for preventing the adoption, or even the prominent discussion, of Mr. Wright's principles at the Peace Convention which was to commence the next day. Four clergymen and six laymen made up the group; Mr. Ladd was anxiously expected, but did not arrive. Messrs. Wright, May, etc., had not been invited. Mr. Beckwith, Rev. George C. Beckwith, a member of the Executi