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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
and about the office a considerable part of the evening, taking care not to be where I should attract notice to the office, but still keeping an eye to it myself. I removed the Liberator books and office books, and what little money we had, that night and the next; but since that time the city has worn so tranquil an aspect that I have not thought it worth while to take the trouble. We also took the precaution on Thursday to send off all the Oasis The anti-slavery volume edited by Mrs. L. M. Child in 1834. to a place of safety, together with the greater part of our volumes and some of the pamphlets. We have a few volumes in the office, just to meet demands which may be made on us. You may keep yourself perfectly quiet where you are, till you get ready to come back. As for Garrison, I do not know but he would be safe enough here in the daytime, but in truth I don't feel myself competent to give any opinion on that point. . . . Garrison is insane, and Thompson has embarked
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ld, H. B. Stanton, James A. Thome and the other seceders (ante, 1.454); flogged on his bare back at Nashville, and driven from the city, in August, 1835, for having copies of anti-slavery publications among the stock of Bibles he was engaged in selling (Lib. 5.156, and Life of Lundy, p. 277). was conspicuous. From New Hampshire came Stephen S. Foster. The business committee consisted of S. J. May, E. Quincy, H. C. Wright, Lib. 9.164. W. L. Garrison, Lucretia Mott, Maria W. Chapman, Lydia Maria Child, Thankful Southwick, and Adin Ballou. A Universalist clergyman, leader at Mendon, Mass., of that wing of the denomination known as Restorationists (the same to which A. St. Clair had belonged); two years later, one of the founders of the Hopedale Community (Non-Resistant, 1:[53]; Noyes's American Socialisms, p. 120; Lib. 11.33). Effingham Capron was in the chair. Of the proceedings Lib. 9.159, 164, 176; Non-Resistant, 1:[73], [80], [81]. there is little need to say much here, fur
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
nd to their consciences. Messrs. Tappan and Denison then arose, and asked those who had voted against the appointment of women to meet and form a new society. The battle being thus ended on the first day, the meeting proceeded to dispose of the pending amendments to the Constitution, which were all rejected save one, viz., that the Executive Committee should thereafter be elected by the Society instead of by the Board of Managers. The result of this change was, that Lucretia Mott, Lydia Maria Child, and Maria W. Chapman were made members of the Committee for the ensuing year. Among the resolutions adopted, that on political duty proved the most troublesome to frame, and in its final shape was offered by C. C. Burleigh. It read (a large majority approving): Resolved, That the Constitution of the American Lib. 10.82. AntiSlavery Society does not settle, or attempt to settle, either affirmatively or negatively, the question whether it is or is not the duty of any of the memb