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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
better health of his family, removed again to Brooklyn, leaving his friend Oliver Johnson as sub-editor in charge of the Lib. 7.99; Ms. June 14, 1837. Liberator, brst flaws that were picked were in the editorial conduct of his substitute, Oliver Johnson, whose articles were always signed with his initial. The Clerical Appealtions [in the Liberator] that the Rev. Dr. Blagden was a slaveholder—meaning Mr. Johnson's repeated inquiry whether that was true which was currently reported of thaendell Phillips's Lynn resolution, Ante, p. 129. which had been seconded by Mr. Johnson in the Liberator]. (5) The abuse of gospel ministers and excellent Christianthe cause would have to abandon it in despair, and weep in secret places. Mr. Johnson promptly made a brief reply, in the Lib. 7.131. course of which he quoted af Sonnets and other Poems by William Lloyd Garrison, published in Boston by Oliver Johnson, in 1843—a persistence worth remembering in the present discussion. Some v
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
, 158. entrusted to the competent hands of Oliver Johnson for the space of three months. Mr. Garrisoon. Resolutions introduced on motion of Oliver Johnson, and adopted unanimously (Lib. 8: 77). Ourof a resolution, moved at the beginning by Oliver Johnson, that women as well as men be invited to bention put Abby Kelley on a committee with Oliver Johnson and Alanson St. Clair, instructing them to Amasa Walker was made President pro tem.; Oliver Johnson, Secretary pro tem.; George W. Benson, one A. B. Alcott, Oliver Johnson, R. F. Wallcut. Johnson, Wallcut, myself, &c.), in order to make the to the nonresistance cause, particularly if Mr. Johnson should remain in Oliver Johnson. Boston, wOliver Johnson. Boston, without interfering with your duties as editor of the Liberator? Very many, I think, who do not wish esidents, Edmund Quincy for Treasurer, and Oliver Johnson for Corresponding Secretary (Lib. 8.207). t of the scheme embraced the employment of Oliver Johnson, as General Agent, to take charge of the b[1 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
W. Benson, at Brooklyn: Your letter to friend Johnson was duly received to-day. Ms. Oliver Johnson. The Oliver Johnson. The action of the anti-slavery society of Windham County at- Thompson [Conn.], with regard to the Liberator, is ti It will be keen and powerful, I doubt not. Oliver Johnson is expected home from Vermont on Tuesday. Mar. agent of the Ohio A. S. Society; at which time Oliver Johnson said of him in the Liberator (9.122), that probave them (Ms. April 15, 1881, Elizur Wright to Oliver Johnson). See, for the sudden change that came over theut woman (Ms. April 15, 1881, Elizur Wright to Oliver Johnson). will be forgotten—and we shall take a living See Mr. Garrison's biographical sketch of Lundy in Johnson's Universal Cyclopedia, Vol. 3. Meantime, the coloalf hour, and will leave any one at our door. Bro. Johnson and wife are to board with us. At Oliver Johnson.Oliver Johnson. present, I am greatly embarrassed for the want of money. I have so many articles of household furniture to b
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
by Wm. M. Chace, Dr. Manford, Alias John Colman. His titulary name, like his anti-slavery profession, was put on (Lib. 10: 111, 131, and Ms. July 16, 1841, Oliver Johnson to W. L. G.) C. M. Burleigh, Samuel J. May, N. P. Rogers, and J. A. Collins, which were frequently responded to in an enthusiastic manner. The muster was ends which cluster around that sacred spot. . . . To-morrow morning, before I go on board of the packet, I hope to get a glimpse at this week's Liberator. Dear Johnson, I feel that he has an arduous task to perform in editing the paper, Oliver Johnson was again supplying Mr. Garrison's place in his absence. and superintendingOliver Johnson was again supplying Mr. Garrison's place in his absence. and superintending the concerns of the printing establishment. May his health and his spirits not fail him. The Columbus at last put to sea at noon on May 22, 1840, and Mr. Garrison, from near Sandy Hook, sent back a farewell to a friend in Boston (perhaps Mrs. Chapman), from which the following is an extract: Knowing how many enfranchis
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
eign A. S. Society. Mr. Phillips wrote to Oliver Johnson (Lib. 10.119): You will hardly believe me ctrified by the receipt of a letter from bro. Johnson, giving me the intelligence of Oliver Johnsoy bro. J. is pronounced by all to be very Oliver Johnson. beautiful, and I gaze upon it with raptur in our country. Tell bro. J. to bear an Oliver Johnson. open front and a serene countenance, and send a report of some of the speeches to bro. Johnson, which appears in the Oliver Johnson. TemperOliver Johnson. Temperance Journal. As I had no opportunity to revise the sketch made by the reporter, you must take it asalso a cheering letter from my beloved friend Johnson. Oliver Johnson. The great moral conflict onOliver Johnson. The great moral conflict on our shores continues to increase in intensity, but, thanks be to God! I am glad to perceive no fal The principal speakers were N. P. Rogers. O. Johnson. W. M. Chace. Samuel Osgood. Rogers, Abby Ke the Standard. Bro. Johnson is now in New Oliver Johnson. York, and will probably remain until you [1 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
very minister. He did try it and took the consequences. Henry C. Wright, Abby Kelley, William Bassett, Thomas Davis, Oliver Johnson, and many others; thus representing the Groton Convention, the Non-Resistant Convention, the old anti-slavery organihard Coeur de Lion, and gives his blows thick and fast. He writes both for the Standard and the Herald of Freedom. Bro. Johnson has been in New York for some weeks past, and O. Johnson. will probably remain there during the winter, superintending O. Johnson. will probably remain there during the winter, superintending the Standard. James C. Jackson is actively engaged in lecturing in western New York. He had, till relieved by Oliver Johnson, been doing yeoman service in editing the Standard. How they are getting along at New York, I do not know. In this StaOliver Johnson, been doing yeoman service in editing the Standard. How they are getting along at New York, I do not know. In this State, we are doing almost nothing. We have not a single agent in the field—and yet this is the very season of the year when we ought to be up and doing. I lecture as often as I can conveniently, but it is very difficult Lib. 10.187, 191, 207. for me
107, 117, 209, 211, 227, 294, 355, 357, 358, 359, 362, 381, 385, 395; J. H. Garrison, 2.362, 413; W. Goodell, 1.345, 2.91; M. Gunn, 2.398; Jacob Horton, 1.124; O. Johnson, 1.204, 221, 267, 272, 280; I. Knapp, 1.340, 341, 515, :44, 107, 138; Liberator, 1.286, 287, 289; B. Lundy, 1.196; Mass. A. S. S., 2.85; S. J. May, 1.221, 314, Foreign A. S. S., 381, not invited to speak by that society at its anniversary, 382, on the same slight to G., 383; namesake of G.'s third son, 413.—Letters to O. Johnson, 2.383, M. G. Chapman, 2.413. Pickering, John [1777-1846], 1.270. Pickering, Timothy [1745-1829], daughter nursed by F. M. Garrison, 1.38, political suppoor, 386, 409, 410, secured as contributor, 420, 423, 428, financial straits, 425, 417, 420, 432; threatened by Leavitt, 418; in charge of J. C. Jackson, 428, of O. Johnson, 420, 428. Stanley, Lord [1799-1869], introduces Emancipation Bill, 1.348; at Wilberforce's funeral, 379. Stanton, Elizabeth Cady [b. Johnstown, N. Y., N