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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
e with the most eminent professors and teachers of religion. Harriet Martineau, en route from Salem to Providence, had passed through the mon or punishment. It is a difficult lesson to learn. . . . Harriet Martineau, the distinguished authoress from Right and Wrong, 1836, (1ding the meeting of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, and H. Martineau's Autobiography, 1.347. avowing her approval of its principles. bro. May and myself, by express invitation, S. J. May. visited Miss Martineau at Mr. Gannett's house. The Rev. E. S. Gannett. interview wavery agreeable and satisfactory to me. She is a fine woman. Miss Martineau's account of this interview is more circumstantial. In her Retng the work of an age, and, as a stimulus, that of a nation! Miss Martineau did not make allowance for Mr. Garrison's respect for so eminenersonal friends to him with an almost idolatrous affection. Miss Martineau's narrative has already slipt away from the first meeting and f
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
than this. . . . Would it not be well to remember Miss Martineau honorably in a resolution — applaud her moral courage,ure being present, and also the Westons, the Chapmans, Miss Martineau, Miss Jeffery, Miss Martineau's travelling companioMiss Martineau's travelling companion. Mrs. Follen, Dr. Channing, &c. I was introduced to Dr. C. on the spot, and shook hands with him, but had no opportunity t'esprit whispered in the ear of Mrs. Follen, who told Harriet Martineau of it, and so it reached the ears of the Channings, ar. Channing said he did not know it was Mr. Garrison. Miss Martineau's version, in her article on the Martyr Age of the Uniave had two long and very satisfactory interviews with Miss Martineau. She is plain and frank in her manners, and not less hanning, and no doubt will do him much good. During Miss Martineau's stay at Dr. Channing's, relates Mrs. Chapman (Ms. Ny, March 6. Mr. Loring's house, among the number being Miss Martineau, Miss Jeffery, Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, Mr. May, Messrs.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
e very [near] producing a mobocratic explosion. He was replied to by Phillips with great effect. Several excellent resolutions, drawn up by Dr. Channing, passed with unexpected unanimity. The triumph has been a signal one for our side (Ms.) In this famous scene the Attorney-General spoke from the gallery, near the great gilded eagle; Mr. Phillips, from a lectern, in the body of the hall, from which Dr. Channing read his resolutions. See Mrs. Chapman's graphic account in a letter to Harriet Martineau (The Martyr Age, Westminster Review, December, 1838). His speech had already been delivered in the Liberator, and in the resolutions Lib. 7.191. (evidently from his hand) adopted by the Board of Managers. From his first editorial utterance some extracts must here be made. The amiable, benevolent, intrepid Lovejoy, he exclaimed, is no more! . . . In his martyrdom Lovejoy was certainly a martyr, said Mr. Garrison later (Lib. 8.3), but, strictly speaking, he was not—at least in our o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
m it has been aptly said, that he severs at a blow what others would be a great while in sawing off. The justly celebrated and discriminating English lady, Miss Martineau, who travelled in our country in 1836, says that having heard every species of abuse of Mr. Garrison, she resolved to have an interview with him, which she thus describes. . . . Ante, p. 69. These extracts are taken from the second volume of Miss Martineau's Retrospect of Western Travel. I recommend to your notice her whole description of the man, which I think remarkably just. As Mr. Garrison is now absent to spend the summer in Connecticut, I shall suggest to the pro tem. editor of the Liberator to publish in the next Liberator Miss Martineau's Lib. 8.104. whole description of Mr. Garrison. I send also per mail the Prospectus to the 8th volume of the Liberator, and a poetical effusion entitled True Rest, which will give you some idea of his religious opinions and views of human government. New
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
nd desired it might be discouraged. It would encounter a strong adverse feeling in England, from which country there would be no female representation. In the meantime, however, the Massachusetts Board had already chosen its delegates, including not only Mr. Lib. 10.55. Garrison, Wendell Phillips, George Bradburn, William Adam (Professor of Oriental Languages at Harvard College), Isaac Winslow, and many other leading abolitionists, white and black, but a large proportion of women— Harriet Martineau, a life-member of the Massachusetts Society; Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Chapman and Mrs. Child, as well as their respective husbands; Miss Abby Kelley, Miss Emily Winslow, and still others. The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society, unabashed by Sturge's rebuke, named a full contingent of their sex, with Lucretia Lib. 10.83. Mott at their head. Her sister delegates were Mary Grew, Sarah Pugh, Abby Kimber, and Elizabeth Neall—all Quakers, except Miss Grew. Mrs. Mott, with Garrison a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
tion you are behind, in this matter of courageous benevolence how far are you before us! My grateful affections are with them and you. In a like spirit, Harriet Martineau wrote to Mrs. Chapman: Garrison was quite right, I think, to sit in the gallery of Lib. 10.174. the Convention. I conclude you think so. It has done muursday, and shall probably leave London with Geo. Thompson and Rogers, on Friday, for Scotland,—going first to Tynemouth, near Newcastle, to spend a day with Harriet Martineau. I shall try to send you a letter by the Great Western, on the 25th inst. Mrs. Thompson is near her confinement. She is in Edinburgh, with her children. T acquaintance made with the beloved bard of negro freedom, James Montgomery. Thence the route led to York and to Newcastle-on-Tyne, for the sake of visiting Harriet Martineau, then writing the Hour and the man, at Tynemouth. In the early morning of July 20, the fellow-travellers, less Thompson and Remond, who had gone before, mou
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
nd the keystone an inference. I was sorry that I could get no opportunity to reply to him. On being pushed as to the meaning of the declaration, There remaineth, therefore, a Heb. IV. 9. rest for the people of God, he said it meant the first day of the week!! Taylor, the sailor preacher, Rev. Edward T. Taylor, commonly called Father Taylor, an eccentric Methodist clergyman, pastor of the Bethel Church in North Square, Boston, and one of the famous pulpit orators of that city. See Harriet Martineau's chapter on Originals, in the second volume of her Retrospect of Western Travel. behaved in a most outrageous manner, and exhibited a dreadfully malignant spirit. There was a great deal of rambling discussion, to very little purpose. Mrs. Folsom interrupted the proceedings Abigail Folsom. continually, and spoke in a very disorderly manner. Mellen Dr. G. W. F. Mellen, another deranged spirit, who became even more troublesome than Mrs. Folsom, because easily made the tool of
ne, 1.242; defends Boston mob, 2.36, abuses H. Martineau, 56; letter from G. Lunt, 97. Advocate (; shakes hands with G., 94, 96, 97; host of H. Martineau, 97, 98; sermons described by G., 98, 106; his shaking hands with Channing, 96; meets H. Martineau, 98; invites G. to hear Channing, and Chann2, and disquiets Channing, 424. —Letters to H. Martineau, 2.189, G., 2.224, 240; from G., 2.360, 362, Anne Knight, 2.367, H. Martineau, 2.378. Chapman, Mary Gray [d. Boston, Nov. 8, 1874, aged 75],1, and abolitionists generally, 447; abuses H. Martineau, 2.56. Cowles, S. S., 2.335. Cox, Abraheaks at legislative hearing, 97, 102; meets H. Martineau, 99; loses Harvard professorship, 102; at M69; commends Channing's Essay,: 55; host of H. Martineau, 56, 98; of G., 69; counsel in Med. case, 7. sec. Mass. A. S. S., 138; interview with H. Martineau, 69, 98; counsel from G. as to A. S. meetinyland, Francis, Rev. [1796-1865], reassures H. Martineau as to Boston mob, 2.36; proslavery moral te[5 more...]