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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 64 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel Peabody Rogers or search for Nathaniel Peabody Rogers in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
f Man, expressly asserted the right of Lib. 7.146. Garrison and the Grimkes to their opinions along with other Quakers—like Elliott Cresson, for example. Whittier, as might have been expected, was not wanting with a letter of encouragement. N. P. Rogers, in the Lib. 7.154. Herald of Freedom, declared of his friend: Under Lib. 7.158. God, William Lloyd Garrison is the mover of American Anti-slavery. But for him I know not why there should be now a single anti-slavery society in the whole la. Primarily it was a tribute to his personal character in a region where he was intimately known, and where his presence never failed to disarm prejudice and opposition. Thus, at Dover, N. H., in 1842, We were amazed above measure, writes N. P. Rogers,to hear brother Francis Cogswell and Rev. Brother Young eulogizing Garrison. I have been highly pleased with Mr. Garrison, said Brother Young. . . . If you would send out such men as Garrison, said friend Cogswell, your cause would prosper.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
referred to Mr. Garrison's friends as those who are intoxicated with one man's infallibility, and that man a Napoleon disastrous to the cause. Rogers, by his N. P. Rogers. fatal incense, had bewildered our noble brother Garrison, who was now manifestly inspired of the devil to interpose barriers and limitations to the cause. nd his conscience. These resolutions, together with kindred testimonials in years past by George Thompson, William Goodell, Amasa Walker, Maria W. Chapman, N. P. Rogers, and others, were afterwards embodied in a circular by the financial committee of the Liberator. On February 13, the New York Executive Committee Lib. 9.35er] had often challenged the opponents of the Liberator to show him a religious paper in the land in which there was so much of the Bible as in the Liberator. N. P. Rogers declared it the organ of the cause, untrammelled by any society limitations. As Wm. Lloyd Garrison is an historical fact in the annals of Antislavery, he will
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
to the hands of a private individual, though, as N. P. Rogers said, the Emancipator was as Lib. 10.93. clearnson to W. L. G.) C. M. Burleigh, Samuel J. May, N. P. Rogers, and J. A. Collins, which were frequently responed; and a committee, consisting of E. G. Loring, N. P. Rogers, J. S. Gibbons, Nathan Winslow, and Thomas Earleur beloved friends William Lloyd Garrison, Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, Charles Lenox Remond, and Lucretia Mott bers, except Miss Grew. Mrs. Mott, with Garrison and Rogers (already a delegate from New Hampshire), being Lib our friends from Oberlin was severely injured. As Rogers and myself have been stopping with our colored N. N. P. Rogers. friend Van Rensalaer, N. P. Rogers reports (in Herald of Freedom, 6.126): At the National MeetinN. P. Rogers reports (in Herald of Freedom, 6.126): At the National Meeting in May, Thomas Van Rensalaer opened his heart and his home in New York to brother Garrison and us, without me of Rogers, I love him; and his friendship for N. P. Rogers. me is ardent and sincere. He has never before
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
n the gloomy old receptacle, as we left it (N. P. Rogers, Lib. 10.143). St. Paul's, etc., etc. The ts Mrs. Mott in her diary. Wm. L. Garrison, N. P. Rogers, Remond, Dr. Hutton and wife, and many othee yesterday, in company with Geo. Thompson, N. P. Rogers, and C. L. Remond. . . . Much do I regref description on my part. George Thompson, N. P. Rogers, and myself addressed the immense concourse was no respecter of persons; and my friend N. P. Rogers was no less faithful in bearing his testimoight readily cut a Ms. flourish about what N. P. Rogers might professionally call the day of the dald be raised to Anon. Ms. Sept., 1840, to N. P. Rogers. provide for the Standard in his absence; asion), and with letters, among others, from N. P. Rogers, who likewise Ms. Sept. 28, 1840, to F. Jthe audience. The principal speakers were N. P. Rogers. O. Johnson. W. M. Chace. Samuel Osgood. Roented to write regularly for the editorial N. P. Rogers. department of the Standard. Bro. Johnson i[1 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
itarian denomination. As we have said, Mr. Garrison's name was conspicuous by its absence, but in the eyes of the New Organizers and the public at large he was constructively at the bottom of the whole thing. As the Standard (perhaps through N. P. Rogers) truthfully pointed out, in another connection: Garrison . . . will not content himself with the one Lib. 10.178. heresy of immediate emancipation, but must be ever and anon broaching others. The community had become familiarized somewha New organization is drooping to its death. Aside from the third-party movement in this State, it has no vitality. In our meetings, we denounce it as the worst form of pro-slavery. Rogers has his hands full in New Hampshire, but he is a N. P. Rogers. moral Richard Coeur de Lion, and gives his blows thick and fast. He writes both for the Standard and the Herald of Freedom. Bro. Johnson has been in New York for some weeks past, and O. Johnson. will probably remain there during the winter,
ree-cotton, 393. Herald of Freedom (Concord), property of N. H. A. S. S., 2.343; edited by N. P. Rogers, 158, 268, 386, 428; notices Clerical Appeal, 167; communication from J. Le Bosquet, 271. dman, 2.250; from J. T. Buckingham, 2.7, S. J. May, 2.60, N. B. Borden, 2.311, S. May, 2.348, N. P. Rogers, 2.419, J. C. Jackson, 2.436. Jackson, James C. [b. Manlius, N. Y., Mar. 28, 1811], on rev 2.182, mobbed, 182. Robinson, Rachel, 2.53. Robinson, Rowland T., of Vermont, 2.53, 348. Rogers, Nathaniel Peabody [b. Plymouth, N. H., June 3, 1794; d. Concord, N. H., Oct. 16, 1846], drops C Standard, National A. S., 2.49; organ Am. A. S. S., 351, founded, 351, 359, first number, 389; Rogers wanted as editor, 386, 409, 410, secured as contributor, 420, 423, 428, financial straits, 425, Worcester (Mass.) A. S. Convention, 2.163, 167, 170; clerical, 244, Young Men's, 245, for G. and Rogers, 414, 417, 418, 420. World, edited by C. W. Denison, 1.415. World's Anti-Slavery Conventio