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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
doubt been informed that Mr. Knapp has been obliged to remove the presses, &c., from the Liberator office. He felt bound to Mr. Mussy to remove. It will be difficult for him to find another room to print the paper in. I have Benj. B. Mussey? recommended him to advertise for one, as the best mode of finding out if any place can be had. I trust there will not be even one week's interruption in the publication of the Liberator. Thompson, you have probably heard, is at Isaac Winslow's in Danvers. Mrs. Chapman told me she saw him there. He was in fine spirits then, and nothing daunted. I should not think it safe for him to appear in Boston now. I still continue of the opinion I expressed when we had the meeting at my office, that Thompson ought to publish a statement of the material circumstances in relation to the charge brought Ante, p. 4. against him. I think it would be believed, though I am far from supposing that it will do much towards allaying the public excitement again
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
ontinue in our land; that it stood on the same level with the Genthoo sacrifices; and that he did not believe a man, or any body of men, could be found in that assembly, who would dare to propose any law, or any resolutions, censuring the antislavery society, or any other. Mr. Rantoul of Gloucester, Mr. Foster of Brimfield, Mr. Hillard of Boston, Mr. Longley of Festus Foster. Thomas Longley. Joshua H. Ward. Gilbert H. Durfee. [Hawley], all spoke in favor of our rights; also, Mr. Ward of Danvers, and Mr. Durfee of Fall River. Mr. Durfee said he was proud to acknowledge himself as one of the proscribed abolitionists, and he thanked God that he stood where he could vindicate his own rights and the rights of others. A motion was now made to lay our memorial upon the table—ayes 204, noes 216. It was then referred to the committee. The next day a warm debate ensued in the Senate. I cherish strong hopes that our Legislature will pass no resolutions against us —a gag law is out of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
o. Circumstances hereafter must determine this matter. At the same date Sarah Grimke, from the hospitable home of Samuel Philbrick, Samuel Philbrick was born at Seabrook, N. H., in 1789. His parents, Joseph and Lois Philbrick, were Quakers; the father, a farmer, being a preacher in that denomination. His schooling was finished at the academy in Sandwich, Mass., and he began his business career in Lynn, after marrying in 1816 Eliza, only daughter of Edward and Abigail Southwick, of Danvers. His sympathy with Mary Newhall's New Light movement led to the sectarian disownment of himself and wife. As already noted (ante, 1.145), he was one of the earliest agents of Lundy's Genius. His admitting a colored child, in charitable training at his own home as a housemaid, to his pew in the First Congregational Church in Brookline (where he went to reside in 1830) was resented as a breach of decorum; and he separated from the church sooner than permit the girl to be relegated to the ne
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
9.59. Orange Scott complained that Birney's political argument Lib. 9.54. had been misreported, availing himself of the opportunity to insinuate that Mr. Garrison, as a Perfectionist, believed in spiritual wives. This clerical slander was most industriously propagated in public and in private during the next few years (e. g., in New Hampshire, in the winter of 1841, as related in Parker Pillsbury's Acts of the Anti-slavery apostles, p. 243). Abner Sanger writes on Mar. 4, 1840, from Danvers, Mass., to Mr. Garrison, of the Rev. Daniel Wise's recent meeting in that place: After the thirteen females had retired, Mr. Wise stated the evil tendencies of the non-resistance doctrines. He said that a man in Putney, Vt. [J. H. Noyes], had written something which you had commented upon with approbation, some time since. Lately, the same person, (he had forgotten his name), had written something in a newspaper carrying out the non-resistance doctrines to the alarming consequences intimated