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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
odied in the twenty-one resolutions on political action presently adopted, after a whole day's discussion, Lib. 8.155, 158. at the great meeting of the New York State Anti-Slavery Society at Utica in September. These were from Goodell's own pen (Lib. 8.158; Goodell's Slavery and Anti-Slavery, p. 469). In New York city, the Emancipator published approvingly the forms of political anti-slavery pledges beginning to be circulated there, and reading: The undersigned, legal voters in the city of New York, will not vote for any man as Representative to Congress who is not in favor of the immediate abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, etc. At the impressive Young Men's Convention held at Worcester, Lib. 8.159, 161, 162. Mass., in October, with Goodell, Beriah Green, and H. B. Stanton in attendance, nineteen resolutions on political action were reported from the business committee, whose chairman was Wendell Phillips, Mr. Garrison being one of his colleagues. They bound abol
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ps. See his indignant assertion of his regard for the institution of marriage in Lib. 11.43, 191. Birney, speaking for himself, affirmed that any one owning Mr. Garrison's scruples Lib. 9.54. ought not to join the Society. He would, indeed, cast out no one, but thought it unworthy in a new sect springing up in the Society, to bend the Constitution to suit their peculiar tenets. The cause, concluded the president of the newly formed Evangelical Anti-Slavery Lib. 9.23. Society of the City of New York (to which only orthodox church-members were eligible), must be relieved of all the extraneous questions which had been connected with it during the past year or two. What are they? asked Mr. Garrison, and proceeded to Lib. 9.55. clarify the atmosphere by a brief exposition of the antislavery organization, from which he and many other founders of it were now sought to be extruded, as being non-voters, and ipso facto disqualified to belong to it. To sustain an assumption so monstrou
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
. Not so high as his own—but still in the 3d or 4th story of a Wall Street cotton storehouse. There we lodged with the Liberator, Henry C. Wright and Geo. Benson of Connecticut,— on the soft side of the best accommodations at friend Van Rensalaer's command, and as good as we required,—better far than our poor plantation clients share. Brother Van Rensalaer would have gladly furnished us all a bed of down. We could not pass over the circumstance unnoticed, that the great anti-slavery city of New York, the headquarters of the American Anti-Slavery Society, before the anti-slavery property and standing seceded from it, while they were yet in its bosom, —where there is a City Anti-Slavery Society—the place of the Tappans and the Jays—that it had not a place for Wm. Lloyd Garrison to lay his head, below that cotton loft. We trust our new-organized brother Jonathan Curtis had snugger quarters. We take this late opportunity of acknowledging, too, the kind hospitality of Thomas True