Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for New York (New York, United States) or search for New York (New York, United States) in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
pamphlets by a Westchester Farmer. The author was the Rev. Samuel Seabury, then and for some time rector of St. Peter's Church, Westchester, and later, by time's curious working, first bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. The four pamphlets, entitled respectively Free thoughts on the proceedings of the Continental Congress, The Congress Canvassed, A view of the controversy between great-britain and her colonies, and An alarm to the legislature of the province of New-York, were a powerful attack upon the aims and policy of the Congress and the patriot leaders, and a plea for such adjustment as would assure to the colonies local self-government, on the one hand. with full recognition of parliamentary authority on the other. For writing the pamphlets Seabury was mobbed, imprisoned, and hounded until in 1776 he took refuge within the British lines. It was in reply to the first of Seabury's pamphlets that Alexander Hamilton, then a college student of seven
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
his opportunities to develop his literary talent, and at the same time increased his desire to exalt the glory of American letters. Unusually sensitive to the faults of his fellow-countrymen, he too often went out of his way to rail at primogeniture, lotteries, French fashions, paper money, and the charities of those venerable married ladies, and thrice venerable spinsters, who go about our cities like roaring lions, doing good. When in such works as in Merry tales of the three Wise men of Gotham (1826), and the New Mirror for travellers (1828), he undertook to quiz political or fashionable failings, his irony was not infrequently more severe than just. The same objection may be applied with double force to the acrimonious squibs which he hurled at British critics who dared sneer at American innovations. See also Book II, Chap. I. Like many of his contemporaries Paulding could not refrain from using his stylus as a dagger whenever patriotically aroused, and he lost no opportunit
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
erest as humorous literature, historical value as pictures of social life in New York during the first decade of the nineteenth century. The famous History of New-York was published in 1809. The mystery surrounding the disappearance of old Diedrich Knickerbocker, to whom was assigned the authorship, was preserved for a number hey, and Jeffrey. Scott had in fact sought him out very promptly, having years earlier been fascinated by the originality and the humour shown in The history of New-York. After a couple of years of desultory travelling and writing, Irving completed a series of papers which were published in New York in 1819-20 and in London ithings Continental, Irving, while in his convictions a sturdy American, became in his sympathies a cosmopolitan. His first noteworthy production, The history of New-York, is so distinctive in its imagination and humour that it is difficult to class. It is purely local in the sense that the characters and the allusions all have t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
80 Mayo, William Starbuck, 320 Mazeppa, 212 Meat out of the Eater, etc., 157 Medina, Louisa, 222, 230 Meditation on a Quart Mug, a, 95 Melanie, 280 Mellichampe, 315 Melville, Herman, 307, 309, 320-323 Memorabilia, 93 Memoirs of an American Lady, 311 Memoirs of the life of William Wirt, 312 M Menander, 178 M Mentoria, 285 n. Mercedes of Castile, 302 Mercury, 118 Meredith, George, 269, 276 Meredith, Hugh, 95 Merry tales of the three Wise men of Gotham, 239 Metabasist, 233 Metamora, 221, 225 Meursius, 12 Michaux, 189, 203 Mico Chlucco, King of the Seminoles, 197 Miles, George H., 223, 224 Military glory of great Britain, the, 216 Milton, 105, 112, i16, 154, 158, 161, 162, 163, 165, 173, 174, 177, 181, 274 Minute philosopher, 86 Mirabeau, 91 Miscellaneous poems an Divers occasions, etc., 166 n. Miscellanies (Tudor), 240 Miscellanies (Verplanck, Bryant, and Sands), 240 Mitchell [manager of the