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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
eople said, Sin. They shot a sheriff. A parrot press cried, Anarchy Lawyers growled, Murder --still, nobody was hung, if I recollect aright. To-day, the heart of the Barnburner beats in the statute-book of your State. John Brown's movement against slavery is exactly the same. Wait awhile, and you'll all agree with me. What is fanaticism to-day is the fashionable creed to-morrow, and trite as the multiplication-table a week after. John Brown has stirred those omnipotent pulses,--Lydia Maria Child's is one. She says, That dungeon is the place for me, and writes a letter in magnanimous appeal to the better nature of Governor Wise. She says in it: John Brown is a hero; he has done a noble deed. I think he was all right; but he is sick; he is wounded; he wants a woman's nursing. I am an Abolitionist; I have been so thirty years. I think slavery is a sin, and John Brown a saint; but I want to come and nurse him; and I pledge my word that if you will open his prison door, I will