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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 148 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 78 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 40 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 38 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Horace Mann or search for Horace Mann in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, Woman's rights. (search)
ion of woman to professional life and the higher ranks of intellectual exertion, up, and throw into her scale this omnipotent weight of your determination to be served by her, and by no other! In this matter, what you decide is law. There is one other light in which this subject is to be considered,--the freedom of ballot; and with a few words upon that, I will close these desultory remarks. As there is no use in educating a human being for nothing, so the thing is an impossibility. Horace Mann says, in the letter which has been read here, that he intends to write a lecture on Woman; and I doubt not he will take the stand which he has always done, that she should be book-taught for some dozen years, and then retire to domestic life, or the school-room. Would he give sixpence for a boy who could only say that he had been shut up for those years in a school? The unfledged youth who comes from college, -what is he? He is a man, and has been subjected to seven years tutoring; but
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 6 (search)
theirs to chain the millions to himself; and then this far-sighted statesman discovered that there were people inclined to underrate the influence of public opinion. [Laughter.] Three cheers for the man who gave the State a new motive to send Horace Mann back to Washington, lest we should be thought guilty abroad of shocking bad taste in the old imperial tongue of the Romans. [Laughter.] Three cheers for the man--(O, I like to repeat the Book of Daniel I)--three cheers for the Whig, the Massaassachusetts representative looked North; we saw only their backs. They have always looked to the Southern Cross; they never turned their eyes to the North Star. They never looked back to the Massachusetts that sent them. Charles Allen and Horace Mann, no matter how far they may be from the level of what we call antislavery, show us at least this cheering sign. While speaking, they have turned their faces toward Massachusetts. They reflect the public opinion of the State they represent.
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
ngame and Wilson, Sumner and Adams, Palfrey and Mann, Chase and Hale, and Phillips and Giddings? When according to rule. [Laughter and cheers.] Mr. Mann, in his speech of February 15, 1850, says: t [Enthusiastic cheers.] So speaks the heart,--Mr. Mann's version is that of the politician. Mr. MMr. Mann's recent speech in August, 1852, has the same non-committal tone to which I have alluded in Mr. igher Law, Mr. Sutherland asked: Is there, in Mr. Mann's opinion, any conflict between that Higher troduce an irrelevant topic into the debate? Mr. Mann avoided any reply, and asked not to be interr The design of Mr. Sutherland is evident. If Mr. Mann had allowed there was no conflict between thetion our Free Soil friends are slow to meet. Mr. Mann saw the dilemma, and avoided it by silence! y remain where it is. If he means that he, Horace Mann, a moral and accountable being, consents to, signifying nothing. If he means that he, Horace Mann, as a politician and party man, consents to
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
eal. Boston had a lawyer once, worthy to stand in that Pantheon; one whose untiring energy held up the right arm of Horace Mann, and made this age and all coming ones his debtors; one whose clarion voice and life of consistent example waked the f Has the State, then, no worthier sons, that she needs import such poor material? Within her bosom rests the dust of Horace Mann, whose name hundreds of thousands of children on Western prairies, looking up to Massachusetts teachers, learn to blesnd the narrow prejudice of Newton closed every door against her, Come to my table; let my roof, then, be your home, said Mr. Mann. [Hearty applause.] Antioch College staggered under $60,000 debt. One, bearing the form of a man, came to its President, and said, I will pay one sixth, if you will promise me no negro shall enter its halls. Let it perish first, was Horace Mann's reply. [Renewed and enthusiastic applause.] The Legislature are asked to put his statue opposite Webster's. O no. When