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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 5 (search)
ed into one republic. Men thought the new generation had indeed come. We waited twelve months, and the turrets and towers of old institutions — the church, law, nobility, government-reappeared above the subsiding wave. Now there are no such institutions here ;--no law that can abide one moment when popular opinion demands its abrogation. The government is wrecked the moment the newspapers decree it. The penny papers of this State in the Sims case did more to dictate the decision of Chief Justice Shaw, than the Legislature that sat in the State-House, or the statute-book of Massachusetts. I mean what I say. The penny papers of New York do more to govern this country than the White House at Washington. Mr. Webster says we live under a government of laws. He was never more mistaken, even when he thought the antislavery agitation could be stopped. We live under a government of men-and morning newspapers. [Applause.] Bennett and Horace Greeley are more really Presidents of the Unit
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 6 (search)
nal beneath a chain four feet from the soil? Did he not recollect he was the author of that decision which shall be remembered when every other case in Pickering's Reports is lost, declaring the slave Med a free woman the moment she set foot on the soil of Massachusetts, and that he owed more respect to himself and his own fame than to disgrace the ermine by passing beneath a chain? There is something in emblems. There is something, on great occasions, even in the attitude of a man. Chief Justice Shaw betrayed the bench and the courts of the Commonwealth, and the honor of a noble profession, when for any purpose, still more for the purpose of enabling George T. Curtis to act his melancholy farce in peace, he crept under a chain into his own court-room. And, besides, what a wanton and gratuitous insult it was! What danger was there, with two hundred men inside the court-house, and three hundred men around it on the sidewalk? Near five hundred sworn policemen in and around that bui
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
word in their defence. Then comes Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw:-- The general principle was, throvision, said Mr. Austin. There sat Prescott, Shaw, Webster, Story, Lincoln,--the men whom you loois, Gentlemen, I will read the remark of Chief Justice Shaw, when he was counsel for the House again will recollect, in 1821. On that occasion, Judge Shaw was counsel for the House of Representativeswell-considered and weighty sentences of Chief Justice Shaw show his idea of the extent of your powehe good old doctrine. In the Prescott case, Judge Shaw went so far as to contend that a judge mighticially recognized in the act of 1793, then Judges Shaw and Loring find the two acts so much alike allege that the same reasoning would condemn Judge Shaw for refusing to set Sims free, by habeas corind who sees no difference between a judge like Shaw, who, thinking he has no power to arrest the Sstrates and people than any casual remark of Judge Shaw to his next-door neighbor as they stand toge[6 more...]
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 10 (search)
e women forgot their homes, it was said, in endeavoring to make the men do their duty. It was a noble lesson which the sisters and mothers of that time set the women of the present day,--I hope they will follow it. There was another charge brought against them,--it was, that they had no reverence for dignitaries. The friend who sits here on my right (Mrs. Southwick) dared to rebuke a slaveholder with a loud voice, in a room just before, if not then, consecrated by the presence of Chief Justice Shaw, and the press was astonished at her boldness. I hope, though she has left the city, she has left representatives behind her who will dare rebuke any slave-hunter, or any servant of the slave-power, with the same boldness, frankness, and defiance of authorities, and contempt of parchment. Then there was another charge brought against their meetings, that they indulged in exceedingly bold language about pulpits and laws and wicked magistrates. That is a sin which I hope will not di
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
Letter to Judge Shaw and President Walker the hotels of Boston, with the connivance of the city government, refuse to obey the Maine Liquor law of Massachusetts. The Revere House, the most fashionable of our hotels, was chosen to offer a public dinner to Morphy, at which were present Judge Shaw, President Walker, the Mayor,Judge Shaw, President Walker, the Mayor, Professor Huntington, and other dignitaries. Lemuel Shaw, Chief Justice of Massachusetts, and James Walker, President of Harvard University. Gentlemen: Now that the press has ceased its ridicule of your homage to Morphy at the Revere House,--a criticism of little importance,--I wish to present the scene to you in a differentLemuel Shaw, Chief Justice of Massachusetts, and James Walker, President of Harvard University. Gentlemen: Now that the press has ceased its ridicule of your homage to Morphy at the Revere House,--a criticism of little importance,--I wish to present the scene to you in a different light. You, Mr. Chief Justice, represent the law of the Commonwealth; to you, Mr. President, is committed the moral guardianship of the young men of her University. Yet I find you both at a table of revellers, under a roof whose chief support and profit come from the illegal sale of intoxicating drink, and which boasts itself