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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 6 (search)
Surrender of Sims. speech before the Massachusetts antislavery Society, at Faneuil Hall Friday evening, January 30, 1852. Mr. Presidek of New England but once. That was about nine months ago, when the Sims brigade were left soundly asleep here, in the gray of the morning, w the awkward squad of Marshal Tukey stole down State Street with Thomas Sims, not deigning to ask their permission or their aid, and leaving p disapprobation and indignant protest against the surrender of Thomas Sims by the city, its sanction of the cowardly and lying policy of thaders of Boston? It is because the merchants chose to send back Thomas Sims,--pledged their individual aid to Marshal Tukey, in case there slave, calling him such. The dogs of Marshal Tukey that arrested Thomas Sims in Richmond Street had to disguise themselves to do it,--dressed much, though it be very little, may still be said for Boston,--that Sims was arrested by lying and disguised policemen; he was judged by a Co
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 7 (search)
Sims anniversary. speech at the Melodeon, on the first anniversary of the rendition of Thomas Sims, April 12, 1852. Thomas Sims, April 12, 1852. Mr. Chairman: There is a resolution on your table to this effect: Resolved, Therefore, That we advise all colored personge of any case where the victim was not finally saved. Thomas Sims is the first man that the city of Boston ever openly bouard to see what we can now do for men in like jeopardy with Sims. Our protest and our rebuke have been already uttered. Itself-moved Who could stand and ask it of another? True, Thomas Sims returned is a great public event, calculated to make Aboy they were ready to take up their muskets in defence of Thomas Sims, or Shadrach, or somebody else. It is very well for ficwe asked the Supreme Court of Massachusetts to interfere in Sims's behalf, on the ground that the law of 1850 was unconstituoot. Almost all these persons have been arrested by a lie. Sims was,--Long was,--Preston was. In the case at Buffalo, the m
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
ame view. Now, if the two acts are so precisely alike that the constitutionality of one proves the constitutionality of the other, then they are such twins as to be both within the meaning and intent of our statute of 1843. When the counsel of Sims and Burns wished to argue the unconstitutionality of the act of 1850, on the ground that it went far beyond anything judicially recognized in the act of 1793, then Judges Shaw and Loring find the two acts so much alike that the argument is unnecesnce of the bench! Yes, truly; that sort of independence which consists in defying the State in order to serve a party, or minister to the ambition of friends. Some men allege that the same reasoning would condemn Judge Shaw for refusing to set Sims free, by habeas corpus, from the grasp of the claimant. But surely he must be stone blind who sees no difference between a judge like Shaw, who, thinking he has no power to arrest the Slave Act when once set in motion, refuses to. interfere, and
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 25 (search)
ity treasury for the indulgences of the Board of Aldermen and Common-Councilmen at an illegal liquor-shop, which no one of them had a right to see without presenting it to the courts within twenty-four hours. In that disgraceful Anthony Burns and Sims experience of the city, upon which I am shortly to speak, one of the melancholy features of city sin that day was, that the men illegally called out to defy the State laws contracted a bill, within sight of the Supreme Court, within sight of City f Boston was acting in that illegal manner, against the statute of the State, and answered Mr. Keyes, Sir, I know it is illegal, but I mean to do it. Help yourself! In 1843, Latimer was arrested by a policeman with a lie in his mouth. In 1851, Sims was surrendered by policemen acting illegally, and avowing their defiance. In 1854, Burns was sent back, and his claimants were aided by the police, contrary to the statute. Unpopular laws! The city can execute anything it wishes to, unpopular