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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 112 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 70 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 42 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 22 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Gerrit Smith or search for Gerrit Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Francis G. Shaw. (search)
Things are going on at a terrible rate on the slavery question. They are trying in Congress to vote payment to the piratical claimants of the Amistad, and to abolish the obligation of Southerners in the Missouri compromise. Think of that! Gerrit Smith is in Congress now, and has made a noble speech. He was interrupted by a member from Maryland, who tried to put him down at the outset by saying, It appears that the gentleman from New York intends to give us an anti-slavery speech. With dignified courtesy, Mr. Smith replied, I do intend to make an anti-slavery speech; and if the gentleman from Maryland wishes to make a pro-slavery speech, I shall listen to him with all courtesy. He is the first one that has stood up like a man, and boldly professed to be an abolitionist. The Southerners respected him, in spite of themselves; for honesty and boldness will be respected. It is reported that one said to another, We have not only got an honest man among us, but the best debater of
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Searle. (search)
To Miss Lucy Searle. Wayland, 1862. So you dispute Gerrit Smith's testimony about my being wise and candid ? I cannot say I have much respect for my wisdom. I think less and less of it every year I live. But when I write for the public, I think I am generally candid. I do not profess to be so in my talk, because that bubblne its spirit. We all present different phases of character, according to circumstances, and I think I do so more than most people. It is natural enough that Gerrit Smith should deem me wise. When I approach him, I don't go dancing on a slack rope, decorated with spangles and Psyche-wings; I walk on solid ground, as demurely assitors. Dear Sarah Shaw likes to see fanciful dancing on moon-beams, and when I write to her I sometimes caracole in a fashion that would make good, sensible Gerrit Smith wonder what had become of the wisdom of his sage friend . . I suppose George's indignation against England is not abated by her recent manifestations. I th
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Theodore D. Weld. (search)
rom them had become available as a political power. All, my friend, that is the only true church organization, when heads and hearts unite in working for the welfare of the human race! And how wonderfully everything came as it was wanted! How quickly the mingled flute and trumpet eloquence of Phillips responded to the clarion call of Garrison! How the clear, rich bugle-tones of Whittier wakened echoes in all living souls! How wealth poured from the ever-open hands of Arthur Tappan, Gerrit Smith, the Winslows, and thousands of others who gave even more largely in proportion to their smaller means! How the time-serving policy of Dr. Beecher drove the bold, brave boys of Lane Seminary into the battle-field! Politicians said, The abolitionists exaggerate the evil; they do not know whereof they affirm; and in response up rose Angelina and her sister Sarah, shrinking from the task imposed upon them by conscience, but upheld by the divine power of truth to deliver this message to
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
tier's tribute to, 240. Shan, Mrs. S. B., letters to, 68, 75, 78, 85, 87, 93, 98, 140, 141, 144, 147, 150, 164, 171, 172, 176, 180, 189, 190, 195, 199, 213, 218, 222, 224, 226, 229, 233, 239. 240, 241,245, 246, 252,258. Sheridan's (Phil.) barbarities toward the Indians, 220. Siam, abolition of slavery in, 216. Silsbee, Mrs., Nathaniel, letters to, 59, 67. Sims, Thomas, the fugitive slave, 144; his ransom secured by Mrs. Child, 145, 189. Slaves, cruelties to, 126-132. Smith, Gerrit, makes an anti-slavery speech in Congress, 70; his regard for Mrs. Child, 166. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 213. Somerville, Mary, Life of, 222. Spanish Gypsy, The, 197. Sphinx, the Egyptian, 71. Spirit-photography, 234. Sprague, Charles, 235. Standard, the National Anti-slavery, edited by Mrs. Child, XIII., 43; letter to, 163. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, and Uncle Tom's Cabin, 69. Suffrage for women, appeal to Mr. Sumner in behalf of, 207. S