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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 18 document sections:

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Introduction. (search)
f the Revolution, which was at once received into popular favor, and ran rapidly through several editions. Then followed in close succession The mother's book, running through eight American editions, twelve English, and one German, The girl's book, the History of women, and the Frugal Housewife, of which thirty-five editions were published. Her Juvenile Miscellany was commenced in 1826. It is not too much to say that half a century ago she was the most popular literary woman in the United States. She had published historical novels of unquestioned power of description and characterization, and was widely and favorably known as the editor of the Juvenile Miscellany, which was probably the first periodical in the English tongue devoted exclusively to children, and to which she was by far the largest contributor. Some of the tales and poems from her pen were extensively copied and greatly admired. It was at this period that the North American review, the highest literary authori
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reminiscences of Dr. Channing by Mrs. Child, written after his death and published in his memoirs. (search)
w Dr. Canning in private. It was immediately after I published my Appeal in favor of that class of Americans called Africans, in 1833. A publication taking broad anti-slavery ground was then a rarity. Indeed, that was the first book in the United States of that character; and it naturally produced a sensation disproportioned to its merits. I sent a copy to Dr. Channing, and a few days after he came to see me at Cottage Place, a mile and a half from his residence on Mt. Vernon Street. It wa on the subject. He urged me never to desert the cause through evil report or good report. In some respects he thought I went too far. He then entertained the idea, which he afterwards discarded, that slavery existed in a milder form in the United States than elsewhere. I was fresh from the bloody records of our own legislation, and was somewhat vehement in my opposition to this statement, and he sought to moderate my zeal with those calm, wise words which none spoke so well as he. We af
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
g their rights, even unto death. But, It is treason; it is revolution, they exclaim. They seem to forget that the war of ‘71G was precisely that. It was a contest with our own government, not with a foreign foe; and the wrongs to be redressed were not worthy of a thought in comparison with the accumulation of outrages upon the free settlers in Kansas. This battle with the overgrown slave power is verily the great battle of Armageddon. I suppose you know that the Supreme Court of the United States has settled everything according to the requisitions of the South? It has decided that slaves may be brought into the free States, like any other property. Such a decision is in direct opposition to the decision of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. If the old Commonwealth don't rise in her moral strength at this attempt to lay the yoke on her, why, then, indeed, the spirit of the Puritans and of '76 has died out; and we must all drift together toward a military despotism, with slav
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Correspondence between Mrs. Child, John Brown, and Governor Wise and Mrs. Mason of Virginia. (search)
he privileges and immunities of a citizen of the United States in the State of Virginia. That Constitution I aul purposes, in common with every citizen of the United States. I was perfectly well aware that such was the tr booted loafers would overrun the troops of the United States like a herd of buffalo, if the government sent tasion of a neighboring nation, at peace with the United States, did you not pledge yourself to commit treason? d to load the mules of Mexico with gold for the United States? Was it not by the murder of unoffending Mexicah that same administration had declared that the United States had an unquestionable right and then they turnedlinded people, by which all the territory of the United States south of 36° 300 was guarantied to slavery, and ent for aid. And all this while the power of the United States, wielded by the slave oligarchy, was on the sidenly strive to reconcile in the government of the United States. Believing in peace principles, I cannot symp
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reply of Mrs. Child. (search)
When Lafayette visited this country in his old age, he said he was very much struck by the great change in the colored population of Virginia; that in the time of the Revolution nearly all the household slaves were black, but when he returned to America, he found very few of them black. The advertisements in Southern newspapers often describe runaway slaves that pass themselves for white men. Sometimes they are described as having straight, light hair, blue eyes, and clear complexion. This c. The inspired muse of Whittier has incessantly sounded the trumpet for moral warfare with your iniquitous institution ; and his stirring tones have been answered, more or less loudly, by Pierpont, Lowell, and Longfellow. Emerson, the Plato of America, leaves the scholastic seclusion he loves so well, and, disliking noise with all his poetic soul, bravely takes his stand among the trumpeters. George W. Curtis, the brilliant writer, the eloquent lecturer, the elegant man of the world, lays th
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
of the Union can be considered as any longer binding upon us; not even by men who have no other consciences than legal consciences. . . . Twenty years ago, John Quincy Adams maintained on the floor of Congress the constitutional right of the United States to proclaim emancipation to all the slaves in time of war, either foreign or civil. He maintained that it was in strict conformity to the law of nations and the laws of war, and he challenged any man to prove to the contrary. No one attempted to do it. Let us hope and trust that a great good is coming out of this seeming evil. Meanwhile, I wait to see how the United States will deport itself. When it treats the colored people with justice and humanity, I will mount its flag in my great elm-tree, and I will thank you to present me with a flag for a breast-pin; but, until then, I would as soon wear the rattlesnake upon my bosom as the eagle. I have raved and I have wept about that Fort Pickens affair. When one puts one's self i
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
sentinel on duty saw a moving in the bushes before him. Who goes there? Answer quickly! Up rose a tall ebony man. Who are you? A fugitive. Are you all right? Yes, massa. Then run quick. Another time, a lordly Virginian rode up to the United States lines with a pass to the other side. He curled his lip contemptuously when a United States sentinel barred the course of his stylish chariot. Where's your pass? The Virginian, scorning to acknowledge authority from a greasy mechanic of theUnited States sentinel barred the course of his stylish chariot. Where's your pass? The Virginian, scorning to acknowledge authority from a greasy mechanic of the North, did not deign to make any reply, but motioned to the slave who was driving his barouche to deliver the paper to the soldier. The slave dismounted and gave the sentinel the required pass. The sentinel seized him, and by a quick motion set him twirling down the hill, at the bottom of which were marshalled the United States forces. Now you can turn back, said the sentinel. But I obtained an order allowing me to pass. How dare you hinder me? Where is your order? My servant just gave
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
vid, who always rejoices over your writings, was especially pleased with the Boat Song, which he prophesies will be sung ere long by thousands of darkies. He bids me say to you that One bugle note from Whittier's pen Is worth at least ten thousand men. So you see that you are at least equal to a major-general in the forces you lead into the field, and your laurels are bloodless. You have of course read The Rejected Stone, >The Rejected Stone; or, Insurrection vs. Resurrection in America by a Native of Virginia. (M. D. Conway.) Boston, 1861. for it is the most powerful utterance the crisis has called forth. God sends us so many great prophets that it seems as if he thought us worth saving; but latterly I fear greatly that there is not virtue enough left in the country to make salvation possible. Slavery seems to have poisoned the fountains of our national life. I do not know whether it is in the providence of God to allow us to be an example to the nations, or whether he
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
d to their masters, and that those who attempted to interfere would be punished; secondly, two of your generals volunteered offers to put down insurrections of the slaves, should they try to obtain their freedom; thirdly, slaves who escaped into your lines were sent back and cruelly scourged by the tyrants from whose power they had sought your protection; fourthly, Mr. Seward charged Mr. Adams not to speak of slavery, and, through him, gave assurance that the status of no class of people in America would be changed by the war ; fifthly, President Lincoln, after the war had continued more than a year, offered the slave-holders a hundred days to consider whether they would come back with their chattels, or still fight for their independence at the risk of the abolition of slavery. Was there anything in this to excite the enthusiasm of the English people about your war? I was obliged to confess that there was not, and that I lad myself often apologized for the common people of England
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
patience with him; but I will say of him that I have constantly gone on liking him better and better. His recent reply to some people who serenaded him charmed me exceedingly. A most beautiful spirit pervaded it. As for Andy Johnson, he has completely taken me captive by his speech at Nashville. To think of that colored procession going through the streets of Nashville, greeted from the windows with hurrahs, and waving of hats and handkerchiefs! To think of the Vice President of the United States promising to be their Moses, to lead them out of bondage, telling them, Remember they who would be free, themselves must strike the blow! And all this in Nashville where Amos Dresser, thirty years ago, was publicly flogged for having an abolition tract in his carpet-bag! Then to think of Maryland wheeling into the circle of free States, with ringing of bells and waving of banners! To think of the triumphal arch in the streets of Baltimore, whereon, with many honored historical names,
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