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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays. You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, I. A Cambridge boyhood (search)
ordinary appearance, short and freckled, and a secondary figure beside Story; yet in later life, with his fine eyes and Apollo-like brow, he became much the more noticeable of the two, as he was certainly far superior in genius. Oftener I went alone. Sometimes I made up stories as I went, usually magnifying little incidents or observations of my own into some prolonged tale with a fine name, having an imaginary hero. For a long time his name was D'Arlon, from the person of that name in Taylor's Philip van Artevelde, which my mother was reading to us. In these imaginings all the small wrongs and failures of my life were retrieved. D'Arlon went through the same incidents with myself, but uniformly succeeded where I had failed, and came out of the crisis with the unerring certainty of one of Stanley Weyman's heroes. One of my chief playmates, Thornton Ware, a handsome boy with curly black hair, the admiration of all little girls, might easily distance me in their regard, but had n
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
friends live in New England; I must have a larger field, and more of the appliances and even luxuries of existence. This recalls what the latest biographer of Bayard Taylor has said of him: The men of New England were satisfied with plain homes and simple living, and were content with the small incomes of professional life. TayloTaylor had other aims. . . . Involved in the expense of Cedarcroft, he never knew the enormous value of freedom. There was nothing intrinsically wrong in the impulse of either, but the ambition brought failure to both, though Taylor, with the tradition of a Quaker ancestry, and with less of perilous personal fascination, escaped theTaylor, with the tradition of a Quaker ancestry, and with less of perilous personal fascination, escaped the moral deterioration and the social scandals which beset Hurlbert, as well as his utter renunciation of all his early convictions. Yet the charm always remained in Hurlbert's case. When we met at Centre Harbor, I remember, he was summoned from dinner on some question about stage arrangements; and the moment he had shut the door
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 11 (search)
is brilliant eyes and tangled hair and beard gave him rather the air of a partially reformed Corsican bandit, or else an imperfectly secularized Carmelite monk, than of a decorous and well-groomed Englishman. He greeted me shyly, gave me his hand, which was in those days a good deal for an Englishman, and then sidled up to the mantelpiece, leaned on it, and said, with the air of a vexed schoolboy, I am rather afraid of you Americans; your countrymen do not treat me very well. There was Bayard Taylor --and then he went into a long narration of some grievance incurred through an indiscreet letter of that well-known journalist. Strange to say, the effect of this curious attack was to put me perfectly at my ease. It was as if I had visited Shakespeare, and had found him in a pet because some one of my fellow countrymen had spelled his name wrong. I knew myself to be wholly innocent and to have no journalistic designs, nor did I ever during Tennyson's lifetime describe the interview.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
owe, Harriet Beecher, 176, 177, 178, 179, 1800 213. Stowell, Martin, 147, 148, 149, 151, 153, 156, 157, 191, 198, 215. Straub, Mr., 209. Straub, Miss, 209. Strauss, D. F., 10r. Stuart, Gilbert, 280. Sullivan, J. L., 263. Sumner, Charles, 53, 125, 146, 175, 196, 267. Suttle, C. F., 148. Swift, J. L., 151. Swinburne, A. C., 289. Swiveller, Dick, 30. Tacitus, C. C., 360. Tadema, Alma, 289. Talandier, M., 304, 305, 306, 309, 300. Taney, R. B., 238. Tappan, S. F., 204, 215. Taylor, Bayard, 0108, 293. Taylor, Henry, 29. Taylor, Tom, 312. Tennyson, Alfred, 67, 272, 287, 291, 292, 294, 295, 296, 314. Thackeray, W. M., 187, 313. Thaxter, Celia, 67. Thaxter, L. L., 66, 67, 76, 94. Thaxter, Roland, 67. Thaxter family, the, 75. Thayer and Eldridge, 230. Therese, Madame, 320. Thomas, C. G., 91. Thompson, William, 198. Thoreau, Miss, 170. Thoreau, H. D., 25, 53, 78, 91, 92, 114, 169, 170, 181, 279, 360. Ticknor, George, 12, 15, 49, 189. Ticknor, W. D., 176. Ti