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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 64 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel Peabody Rogers or search for Nathaniel Peabody Rogers in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
he emphasis that a printer knows how to give with types, his Thoughts on Colonization. His Liberator editorials and this tremendous pamphlet at once struck the thinking minds of the country with wonderment and awe. Old politicians of both parties bit their lips, if they did not gnash their teeth, and, in the absence of any other defence, invoked the mob. It was in vain. The fire was kindled. When such men as the Tappans, Alvan Stewart, Gerrit Smith, General Fessenden, Theodore D. Weld, N. P. Rogers, President Storrs, Beriah Green, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Amos A. Phelps, dropped the Colonization Society, Not all those mentioned by Mr. Wright waited for the publication of the Thoughts to discontinue their support of the Society. See, for Arthur Tappan, ante, p. 261, and particularly Lib. 3.55, where Mr. Tappan, after stating that the first thing which shook his confidence in the Society was the fact that ardent spirits were allowed to be sold at the colony (compare Niles'
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
b. 4.206, 207. characteristic singleness of moral purpose and cloudiness of logic. We remark, further, the first appearance in the anti-slavery ranks of Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, of Plymouth, N. H., already seeming a warm personal friend of Lib. 4.38. Mr. Garrison, and vouched for by the latter as an able lawyer and an enlightened Christian; Rogers was corresponding secretary of the local anti-slavery society, and, together with D. L. Child and S. E. Sewall, one of the trustees of the Noyes Academy at Canaan. N. H., which was opened in the fall of 1834 to colored youth on equal terms with white (Lib. 4.38, 169). of Rogers's neighbor, John Farmer, tRogers's neighbor, John Farmer, the antiquarian; of Farmer's Lib. 4.175. constant correspondent in Boston, Francis Jackson; Francis Jackson was born in Newton, Mass., in 1789, and became the historian of that town. His father, Timothy Jackson, was a minute-man who joined in the pursuit of the retreating British on April 19. 1775. He himself was a soldier
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
September 15, 1835. my dear brother Garrison: Your letter of the 3d, obtained on my return from the Granite State, was truly refreshing. Its advice with reference to my visit to Plymouth [N. H.] was received too late. I am not sorry, as I had the privilege of giving three lectures to quiet, respectable, and very intelligent audiences, including many of the delegates to the General Association, then in session. We had a delightful sojourn under the roof of our truly excellent friend, N. P. Rogers. He is a charming man—as a companion I hardly know a man with superior endowments. A full mind; ready, polished wit, and a comprehensive and glowing heart: the whole adorned and sanctified by the influences of religion, which I believe he humbly but deeply enjoys. You would have been delighted to have shared our adventures in Concord (??) on the memorable night of the 4th inst. The mirthful and the melancholy were so strangely and equally blended throughout, that I scarcely know whic