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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
hed for his munificent philanthropy, and in Providence he met William Goodell, who was then Ibid., p. 25. publishing a paper called the Investigator. I endeavored Ibid., p. 25. to arouse him, records Lundy, but he was at that time slow of speech on my subject—a slowness for which he afterwards amply atoned. William Goodell (born in Coventry, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1792, died in Janesville, Wisconsin, Feb. 14, 1878) was a lineal descendant of Robert Goodell, one of the earliest settlers of Danvers, Massachusetts (1634). Disappointed in his hope of a collegiate education, he early entered business life at Providence, R. I., and subsequently, at the age of 24, made a long voyage to the East Indies, China, and Europe, as supercargo. After his return he was merchant and book-keeper successively at Providence, Alexandria, Va., and New York, until, in 1827, he established the Investigator at Providence, devoted to moral and political discussion, and reformation in general, including tempe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
familiar to the readers of the Liberator—the first life-member of the New-England Anti-Slavery Society—the friend of the poor and needy, and supporter of the various benevolent operations of the times—whose interest in the abolition cause is unsurpassed—and to whom I labor under very onerous obligations. Our meeting was a cordial one. On his return from Bangor, he stopped at Waterville, where he was entertained by the President of the College, the Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin, Formerly of Danvers, Mass. (See vol. VIII. Coll. Maine Hist. Soc., p. 178.) Mr. Chaplin's wife, Eunice Stickney, was a distant relative of Mr. Garrison's, though neither host nor guest was aware of the fact. (See the Stickney Genealogy, pp. 87, 146, 458.) and spoke to the students on colonization. At Augusta he attended a meeting called by the Rev. Cyril Pearl, in aid of the Colonization Society, and so embarassed the agent by his questions and Lib. 2.167. impressed the audience by his appeal in opposition