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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
at his prejudices against the people of color are active and inveterate. His notions of justice and pleas of expediency are utterly abhorrent to our moral sense. He persisted in saying that the condition of the slaves was better than that of the laboring classes in Great Britain!!— an assertion which makes his own countrymen a servile and brutish race, and which any man who knows the difference between black and white should blush to advance. Carey, it will be remembered, was a native of Ireland. Compare Dr. Channing's letter to Miss Aikin of Dec. 29, 1831 (p. 113 of Correspondence ): But do you know how slaveholders reconcile themselves to their guilt? . . . Our slaves subsist more comfortably than the populace and peasantry of Europe. . . . I acknowledge the sophistry, but mourn that it should have so much foundation. Notice also that Mathew Carey had published in 1796 St. George Tucker's Dissertation on Slavery; with a Proposal for the Gradual Abolition of it in the State of V
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
and trust that your exertions will be crowned with success. I remain, my dear sir, Yours very faithfully, Zachary MacAULAYulay. Clarkson visited, and a few parting shots sent after the impostor Cresson See two letters to the London Patriot, dated July 22 and Aug. 6, 1833 (Lib. 3.169, 201). In the last, Mr. Garrison says, I maintain that the guilt of slavery is national, its danger is national, and the obligation to remove it is national. (who was discovered to be on his way to Ireland, in company with an Irish female partisan, but would find that O'Connell's speech had reached Dublin before him), Mr. Garrison's mission seemed ended. The Providence, however, which had brought him to England in season to witness the passage Lib. 3.163. by Parliament of the bill emancipating 800,000 slaves in the British West Indies, had in store for him an even more precious privilege. Three days after the reading of the bill for the second time in the House of Commons (July 26) It
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
come, we must be in the midst of them. To us, then, it belongs to judge of the exigencies of our own condition, to provide for our own safety, and perform our own duties without the audacious interference of foreign emissaries. Such incendiary language, whatever its motive, could have but one logical effect in a community so overwrought as that of Boston. When the orator, in conclusion, bade the philanthropist go back to England, and see if he would be safe in denouncing the wrongs of Ireland and of India; It will appear hereafter how much Mr. Thompson's Indian labors in the meantime reconciled the Spragues to him on his second visit to America, in 1851. and declared that Christ did not denounce Roman slavery in his native country, and was no immediate abolitionist (No, his precept was, Servants [slaves], obey your masters, ), but allowed his religion to work changes in the condition of mankind by degrees, he had enumerated nearly all of the stock arguments against emancipati