Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
rward, it was reported to me by the city officers that they had ferreted out the paper and its editor; Mayor Otis might have saved the ferreting by handing the city officers his copy of the Liberator, with the publication office declared upon the first page. He had had practice in this sort of inquisition (Ante, p. 160). That his office was an obscure hole, his only visible auxiliary a negro boy, and his supporters a very few insignificant persons of all colors. This passage inspired Lowell's elevated poem to W. L. Garrison: In a small chamber, friendless and unseen, Toiled o'er his types one poor, unlearned young man; The place was dark, unfurnitured, and mean:— Yet there the freedom of a race began. Help came but slowly; surely no man yet Put lever to the heavy world with less: What need of help? He knew how types were set, He had a dauntless spirit, and a press. Such earnest natures are the fiery pith, The compact nucleus, round which systems grow! Mass after mass become
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
h prohibit them from meeting, and that they have a fund of $200 which they want to give where it will be used for the benefit of the colored people. He thinks they will give it to us. Please to write me immediately in reply. Address to me at Lowell, and oblige thy assured friend. Garrison in England will do the cause more good in three months than in twelve in America, by the reception he will there meet, and by his communications through the columns of the Liberator, &c., &c. Excuse the& Knapp, Boston. Andover, 10th mo. 24, 1832. Ms. I am to deliver a lecture here this evening, and to-morrow morning I go to Newburyport and hope to meet Friend Garrison there and proceed with him to Boston. . . . I got a letter from him at Lowell, saying he proposed to return to Boston this week to prepare for a voyage to Europe, should the means be provided and his friends unitedly think it desirable. I hope and presume there will be but one opinion on the subject. It was to consult on
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
sing resolutions in Tammany Hall, burst in on the heels of the retreating members. The story of the riot has been told in the Life of Arthur Tappan (pp. 168-175) and in Johnson's Garrison and his Times (p. 145). Mr. Garrison's relations to it are all that can concern us here. Swaggering John Neal, There swaggers John Neal, who has wasted in Maine The sinews and chords of his pugilist brain. A man who's made less than he might have, because He always has thought himself more than he was. Lowell's Fable for critics. who, naturally enough as a notorious Colonizationist, took a leading part in it, has left this blundering account in his Wandering Recollections of a somewhat busy life : As I happened to be going through New York, with my P. 401. wife, on our way to the Western country, and thence to Europe, in 1834, or 1835, I should say, I found myself one day in the Courier and Enquirer office, where, by the way, I first met with Mr. Bennett, who had just been secured for t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
from Augusta to Hallowell, but Lib. 5.4. were overawed. At Concord, New Hampshire, he was interrupted with missiles while addressing a ladies' meeting. At Lowell, Mass., on his second visit, in the Town Hall, a brickbat thrown from without through the Lib. 4.194; Cowley's History of Lowell, p. 82, and Reminiscences of J. CLowell, p. 82, and Reminiscences of J. C. Ayer, p. 154. window narrowly escaped his head, and, in spite of the manliness of the selectmen, a meeting the next evening was abandoned in the certainty of fresh and deadly assaults. Before this conclusion was known, a placard in the streets (December 2), declaring that agitation of the slavery question would endanger the saered with by their Northern brethren. The mob found the premises empty, but took possession, and adopted resolutions, framed by three of the foremost citizens of Lowell, Including John P. Robinson and Thomas (afterwards Judge) Hopkinson, leading lawyers. From the latter's office Wendell Phillips had lately gone to be admitted