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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
was well worth doing, it cannot be considered as a strong original contribution to American letters. Women who wrote. The same disappearance of secondary figures applied to the women of that period. Lydia Maria child. There was Lydia Maria Child, for instance, whose Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans was the first anti-slavery appeal in book form; and had very marked influence on her younger contemporaries. Mrs. Child's Letters from New York were so brilliant as tMrs. Child's Letters from New York were so brilliant as to be ranked with similar work of Lowell's for quality, but have now almost passed into oblivion. The same is true of Miss Sedgwick; and Miss Alcott's name, though still living and potent with children, no longer counts for much with their elders. Of wider power was the work of three other women, whose names are, for different reasons, still remembered: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Helen Jackson, and Emily Dickinson. Harriett Beecher Stowe. Mrs. Stowe was born in New England. If she had spent
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
es, Nathaniel, 58. Ancient Mariner, Coleridge's, 68. A New home, Who'll follow? Mrs. Kirkland's, 240. Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans, Mrs. Child's, 125. Areopagitica, Milton's, 165. Arnold, Matthew, 266, 283. Arthur Gordon Pym, Poe's, 208. Arthur Mervyn, Brown's, 70. Astoria, Irving's, 240. e Deific, Whitman's, 232. Charlotte Temple, Mrs. Rowson's, 92, 241. Chasles, M. Philarete, 244. Chastellux, Marquis de, 54. Chatham, Lord, 44, 45. Child, Lydia Maria, 125, 126. Choate, Rufus, 112. Christabel, Coleridge's, 219. Christianus per Ignem, Mather's, 17. Christus: a Miystery, Longfellow's, 144. Clara Lee, Richard Henry, 44. Lessons of a Preceptress, Hannah Webster's, 92. Letters from a farmer in Pennsylvania, Dickinson's, 54. Letters from New York, Mrs. Child's, 126. Letters from Silesia, J. Q. Adams's, 66. Lettersfrom under a Bridge, Willis's, 261. Lewis, Estelle Anne, 210. Lewis and Clark, 239. Lexingt