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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for William Burke or search for William Burke in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
nd later the academy of the Rev. John Bransby in Stoke Newington. He impressed Bransby as a quick and clever boy, though embarrassed by an extravagant amount of pocket-money; and John Allan wrote of him in 1818 that he was a fine boy and read Latin pretty sharply. In 1816 Allan described him as thin as a razor, but in 1819 he wrote that he was growing wonderfully. On his return to Richmond in the summer of 1820, Poe entered an academy kept, first, by Joseph H. Clarke and, later, by William Burke, under whom he continued his work in the languages, earning the admiration of his fellows by his readiness at capping verses from the Latin and by his skill in declamation. He also wrote verses of his own, and it is said that a sheaf of his juvenilia was collected in 1822 or 1823 in the hope that they might be published in volume form. But before the end of 1824 he had somehow broken with his foster-father, and the breach between the two was never to be entirely healed. The boy posses
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
e administration organs and their opponents were the chief sources of news for the papers of the country. One question of great importance to the press was early raised and settled. Reports of state legislative proceedings had always been permitted in the colonies, though in Massachusetts the reporters had been denied the use of the chaplain's pulpit as a desk. As soon as the first Congress assembled, the newspapers began to print the proceedings and debates, whereupon, in September, a Mr. Burke moved that representatives of the press should be excluded from the sessions. After a warm debate the resolution was withdrawn, never again to be revived, at a time when the taking of notes in the British Parliament was still forbidden. Partisan bitterness increased during the last decade of the century. New England papers were generally Federalist; in Pennsylvania there was a balance; in the West and South the anti-Federalist press predominated. Though the Federalists were vigorous
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
effects unspoiled. His narrative of the Saratoga campaign is solid historical writing; but alas, hard at its heels follows the judgment that Saratoga was more important than Marathon. In description, in narrative, in its dry controversial humour, Dwight's style is a sound eighteenth-century style, very serviceable in conveying his keen judgments upon statecraft and college management; an administrator's style, clean in structure, sharp and low-toned in diction, modelled upon Johnson and Burke, but with an occasional richer rhythm. The bloom of immortality, already deeply faded, now withered away. The apostle Eliot, when he died, undoubtedly went to receive the benedictions of multitudes, who, but for him, had finally perished. Sometimes there are short passages of a sober eloquence not unlike Edwards's own. Of the congregation to whom Dr. Swift had been a faithful pastor Dwight observes: Many of them will probably remember him with gratitude throughout eternity. But such piec
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
40, 65, 164, 167, 173, 174, 241, 266, 268, 275, 280, 303 Bryant's minstrels, 291 Buchanan, Robert, 271 Bucke, R. M., 272 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph, 206 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 197, 207 Buffon, 201 n. Bugle echoes, 303 Building Eras in religion, 213 Building of the ship, the, 39 Bulletin Universel, 209 Bunner, Henry Cuyler, 242, 243-244, 376, 385, 386, 388 Bunyan, John, 18 Burk, John D., 106 Burke, Aedanus, 180 Burke, Edmund, 96, 99, 104, 203 Burke, William, 56 Bums, Robert, 44, 50, 353 Burns, 45 Burr, Aaron, 200 Burroughs, John, 236, 262 n., 271 Burton, W. E., 59 Burton's gentleman's magazine, 59, 63, 68 Bury them, 284 Bushnell, Horace, 207, 211-213 Butler, Joseph, 196 Butterworth, Hezekiah, 404, 409 Byers, S. H. M., 284 Byrd, William, 149 Byron, 3, 33, 45, 57, 66, 99, 237 By the Potomac, 281 Cabet,√Čtienne, 188 Cable, George W., 351, 359, 360, 365, 379, 380, 383-384, 390 Calamus, 268, 271 Calhoun,