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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Charles Colcock Jones or search for Charles Colcock Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
ominent inventor, graduated at Yale, and won distinction as lawyer, judge, newspaper editor, Methodist minister, and president of Emory College. His realistic descriptions of country parties, debating societies, horse-trades, fox-hunts, shooting-matches, brutal fights, and the adventures of his hero, the practical joker Ned Brace, insured a fruitful career to humour in the South, which before the Civil War enlisted at least a dozen considerable names in its ranks. From Georgia also came Major Jones's courtship (1840), intimate and comic letters by William Tappan Thompson (1812-82), who had an interesting career as editor and soldier in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, Maryland, and Georgia. One of the best of early Southern humorists was an Alabama editor, Johnson J. Hooper (1815-62), whose Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs (1846) was admired by Thackeray. Captain Suggs is an amusing rascal, who lives by his wits and who is presented with rare irony by an author who had perhaps the mos
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
were written largely to assuage a sad longing for his boyhood home. These writings show him to have been, in spite of his political opinions, of the old school of Southern gentlemen. More typical both in opinions and in fervour was Charles Colcock Jones, Jr. (1831-93). Born in Savannah, he graduated from Princeton in 1852 and the Harvard Law School in 1855. His Southern convictions, however, still intact, were intensified by his service in the artillery of the Confederate States. When theYork City, he became the spokesman of the new era, and the title of that speech became the watchword of a vast movement. Though it aroused the ire of the old school, as seen above in the denunciation of the banners of utilitarianism by Charles Colcock Jones, Jr., it expressed a new sense of the economic basis of society and of the social conditions which must obtain more and more in the regenerated South. Some of his later speeches are notable. The South and her problem, delivered in Dallas,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
Georgia schools. It is a remarkable fact that the middle counties of Georgia have produced the most representative humorists of the South. Among those who were born or who at some time lived in this part of Georgia may be mentioned A. B. Longstreet, See also Book II, Chap. XIX. the author of Georgia scenes; Richard Malcolm Johnston, See also Book III. Chaos. IV and VI. the author of The Dukesborough tales; William Tappan Thompson, See also Book II, Chap. XIX. the author of Major Jones's courtship; and Harry Stillwell Edwards, the author of Two Runaways and other stories. In the same section were born the two poets Francis O. Ticknor, See also Book III, Chap. III. author of Little Giffen of Tennessee, and Sidney Lanier. See also Book III. Chap. IV. Middle Georgia was also before the war the most democratic part of the slaveholding states, a circumstance not without its influence upon the development of Harris's genius. The sons of the richest men, he tells u
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Judge S. E., 264 Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 38, 94, 124, 203, 234, 239, 367 Johnston, Albert Sidney, 306 Joseph E., 306 Joseph E., Richard Malcolm, 316, 318, 320, 347, 365, 379, 389 Jonas books, 400 Jonathan to John, 280 Jones, Charles Colcock, Jr., 316-318, 322 Josh Billings. See Shaw, H. W. Josselyn, John, 149 Journal (N. Y.), 178 Journal (Louisville), 281 Journal of American Folk-Lore, 356 n. Journal of an African Cruiser, 21 Journal of a solitary man, thes, 180 Madisonian, the, 183 Maeterlinck, 22 Magazine of useful and entertaining knowledge, the, 165 Magnolia, the, 175 Mahon, Lord, 18 Maidenhood, 36 Main-Travelled Roads, 388, 390 Maitland, F. W., 130 Main Street, 22 Major Jones's courtship, 153, 348 Malmesbury, Earl of, 141 Malvern Hill, 281 Manly, Louise, 304 Mann, Horace, 320 Man without a country, the, 374 Marais du Cygne, Le, 51 Marble faun, the, 21, 30 Marbury vs. Madison, 73-74 Marchin