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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 8 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
ts special sense of a heritage of no mean spiritual content, rich also in picturesque associations and romantic memories. The high-water mark of Whittier's artistic achievement was undoubtedly reached in the years that gave birth to Snow- Bound and The Tent on the Beach. The latter and less important of these two works is a cycle of narratives in verse, linked together in the fashion of Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside inn. The company are three in number, Fields the lettered magnate and Taylor the free cosmopolite being foregathered on Salisbury Beach with Whittier, who thus describes himself: And one there was, a dreamer born, Who, with a mission to fulfil, Had left the Muses' haunts to turn The crank of an opinion-mill, Making his rustic reed of song A weapon in the war with wrong. The poems which make up the cycle fall into the general class of Whittier's narrative verse; the thousand lines of octosyllabic rhyme which are entitled Snow-Bound are almost in a class by themse
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
he best writers of the country, and conducted what was in many ways the best general literary magazine. The Knickerbocker Gallery, an elaborate gift book published for the benefit of the editor in 1855, and made up of brief poems and essays donated by contributors to the magazine, contained pieces by Washington Irving, William Cullen Bryant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell, N. P. Willis, Fitz-Greene Halleck, Donald Grant Mitchell, George H. Boker, Bayard Taylor, T. W. Parsons, Epes Sargent, J. G. Saxe, James T. Fields, Charles Godfrey Leland, George William Curtis, Park Benjamin, Rufus W. Griswold, Richard Henry Stoddard, C. F. Briggs, and many more; and among other contributors of the early time were Miss Sedgwick, James Gates Percival, Richard Henry Wilde, Mrs. Sigourney, William Gilmore Simms, J. G. Whittier, Horace Greeley, and James Fenimore Cooper. The importance of The Knickerbocker magazine may be judged by this list of names; yet in d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
urite feature was the series of letters from the editor or other member of the staff who travelled and wrote of what he heard or saw. Bowles, Olmsted, Greeley, Bayard Taylor, Bennett, and many others thus observed life and conditions at home or abroad; and they wrote so entertainingly and to such purpose that the letters—those of Olmsted and Taylor, for instance—are still sources of entertainment or information. The growth of these papers meant the development of great staffs of workers that exceeded in numbers anything dreamed of in the preceding period. Although later journalism has far exceeded in this respect the time we are now considering, still the was the master spirit. It included Henry J. Raymond, who later became Greeley's rival on the Times, George M. Snow, George William Curtis, Charles A. Dana, Bayard Taylor, George Ripley, William H. Fry, Margaret Fuller, Edmund Quincy, and Charles T. Congdon. It is easy to understand how with such a group of writers the idea of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
d to see how soon the conversation drifted off into politics. It was not until after in the library that we got upon anything really interesting. Longfellow, Taylor, Story, and Stoddard (in his early days) were practitioners of the poetic art rather than workers in the real material of human experience. There were other singd play too much with allegory and ancient mythology for the best effect. The Dirge, called forth by the death of General Kearny, is spontaneous and haunting. Bayard Taylor, See also Book III, Chap. X. a friend of Boker, while ardently sympathetic toward the Union cause, and a speaker in its behalf in America and England, showhorseman's crooked brand, and rein The charger on the battle-field. Thereafter the passion of events is recorded in the poems of the war, North and South. Bayard Taylor's Through Baltimore cried out against the opposition offered by Southern sympathizers to the passage through Baltimore streets of the Sixth Massachusetts. A. J
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
tion inevitably arises as to how these poets developed after the Civil War. One would naturally suppose that many of the younger ones especially would grow in power and influence. But all the causes generally assigned for the lack of poetry in the ante-bellum South prevailed in the new era; and thereto were added poverty, widespread disaster, and an overwhelming confusion in the public mind. Lanier tersely expressed the chief limitation under which the writer laboured when he wrote to Bayard Taylor: Perhaps you know that with us of the younger generation of the South since the war, pretty much the whole of life has been merely not dying. Simms wrote to Hayne just before his death in 1870: I am rapidly passing from a stage where you young men are to succeed me, and inscribed for his tombstone the poignant words: Here lies one who, after a reasonably long life, distinguished chiefly by unceasing labours, has left all his better works undone. Meek, O'Hara, John R. Thompson, and Henr
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
Evening Bulletin. Within a month Lanier was at work on a second ambitious poem, The Symphony, which appeared in June, and which brought him the friendship of Bayard Taylor. The firm of Lippincott was able to fill Lanier's time with hackwork. The whole summer was spent in preparing a sort of spiritualized guidebook to Florida. to a time during which I must get upon paper as many as possible of the poems with which my heart is stuffed like a schoolboy's pocket. When at the instance of Bayard Taylor he was appointed to write the cantata for the Centennial Exposition to be held in Philadelphia, he was jubilant. His patriotic fervour produced also The Psalmtoo he triumphed over his untoward surroundings, as the brief sketch of his life has indicated. Pathetic witness to this inherent bent is found in a letter to Bayard Taylor: I could never describe to you what a mere drought and famine my life has been, as regards that multitude of matters which I fancy one absorbs when one is
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
accomplished pens, and the editor of the massive North American review, Charles Eliot Norton, would edit also a boy's library. It was perceived that simplicity need not be inane, and that to entertain children without enfeebling their intellect or stultifying their sentiment afforded scope for mature skill and judgment. Our young Folks, published by Ticknor and Fields (about 1865), enlisted Mrs. Stowe, Whittier, Higginson, Aldrich, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, E. E. Hale, Rose Terry Cook, Bayard Taylor. It was edited by J. T. Trowbridge, Gail Hamilton, and Lucy Larcom; and later was merged into St. Nicholas, edited by Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge (1838-96). With these magazines a new era begins. The notable success of the period was made, however, by one whose work for adults was only mediocre. Louisa M. Alcott (1832-88) was asked by a publisher in 1867 for a girl's book, and began her task reluctantly. But wisely deciding not to write down, she merely spoke out, with no more than the p
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
trines contained in divine revelation explained and defended, 199 Tabb, John B., 291, 326-329, 330, 342, 343, 345 Tales for the Marines, 154 Tales of a Wayside inn, 39, 49 Tales of soldiers and Civilians, 387 Talisman, the, 174, 369 Talvi (Mrs. Robinson), 136 Tamerlane and other poems, 57 Tamerlane, 66, 68 Taney, Roger Brooke, 89 Tanglewood tales, 401 Tannenbaum, 0 Tannenbaum, 295 Tar-Baby Story and Other Rhymes of Uncle Remus, The, 350 Tardy George, 280 Taylor, Bayard, 49, 167, 190, 192, 276, 278, 280, 311, 337, 338, 344, 402 Taylor, John, 84-85 Temperance, 45 Tennent, Gilbert, 198 Tennessee's partner, 380, 385 Tennyson, 3, 5, 39, 52, 224, 248, 254, 271 Tenting on the old camp ground, 285 Tent on the Beach, the, 46, 49 Ten years on a Georgia plantation, 3, 4 Term of service ended, 286 Terrell, Uncle, George, 354 Thackeray, 153, 172, 232, 371, 384, 391 Thayer and Eldridge, 268 Theology explained and defended, 200 T