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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ts, through the introduction into important offices of a far larger proportion of intelligent, non-slaveholding freemen. It is obvious that a man who is not an abolitionist at all May be A Liberty man; for he may anxiously desire and zealously labor for these objects, though he may not be prepared to devote himself to the more general objects of universal emancipation. Mr. Chase's letter was appropriately addressed to the managers of a New York Liberty Party Convention in Syracuse in October, where for the first time the lines Lib. 12.170. were drawn so as to exclude all but party members from sharing in the proceedings. These managers, annoyed by the activity of the agents of the American Anti-Slavery Society in their preserves, complained that it and its organ encouraged abolition connection with the Whig or Democratic Party. A most voluminous onslaught was therefore made on the Society and the Standard by Lib. 12.170, 173. William Goodell, in an address to the political
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
is another thing (Ms. Aug. 24, 1843, W. Phillips to E. Pease). Mrs. Garrison's right arm was dislocated at the elbow, but was maltreated by an ignorant doctor as if broken, so that weeks of suffering ensued till the limb could be set. This was made the occasion of special visits to Dr. Stephen Sweet, Lib. 13.171. the famous bone-setter, at Franklin, Conn., who succeeded in the difficult operation, though a subsequent dislocation of the same joint was carried through life. By the end of October the family had returned to Boston, occupying a new house on Pine Street, with Oliver Johnson and his No. 13. wife as welcome co-tenants. The Liberator, all this time, had been supplied editorially by several friends—by Quincy and Mrs. Chapman above all—with no loss to the readers of the paper. Mr. Garrison's physical condition and various distractions during the past two years had confirmed his native habit of procrastination, and laid him open to friendly criticism: Edmund Quinc
ected to inquiry. Amendments to the Constitution will be initiated. Robert C. Winthrop made his surrender on the Fourth of July, and in Faneuil Hall, toasting, in famous words, Our country . . . however bounded; . . . to be cherished in all our hearts, to be defended by all our hands Lib. 15.118.—an abasement which accepted war with Mexico, along with that spread of slave territory which he had hitherto strenuously opposed. In the same hall of heroic memories the Whig State Convention in October withdrew from the opposition, and left Lib. 15.162. the Constitutional question to the Supreme Court of the United States! Governor Slade of Vermont could no longer urge his State to take, unsupported, an unrelenting attitude, and sought comfort in the illusion that Lib. 15.170. the entrance of Texas into the Union would make slavery a national institution as never before, and expose it to attack as such. Webster, accusing the Liberty Party Lib. 15.182. (by its defeat of Clay) of having
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
e pioneer in the anti-slavery cause in the United States, and the tried, and constant, and devoted friend of the oppressed. The schismatics strenuously sought to postpone the national convention Lib. 17.106, [130]. at Buffalo till the spring of 1848, but were overruled. The two factions meantime met at the State Convention Lib. 17.158. held at Worcester, Mass., in September, when a resolution indirectly nominating John P. Hale for President was voted down after an acrimonious debate. On October 21 this outcast of the Democratic Party (thanks to Lib. 18.7. his manly opposition to the annexation of Texas and the Lib. 17.178, 185; 18.18. Mexican War) received the nomination of the convention at Buffalo. It was, however, a strong Gerrit Smith delegation which Lib. 17.178. H. C. Wright accompanied on the boat from Cleveland. For six hours during the passage the saloon was crowded with a caucus over which Owen Lovejoy presided, with George Bradburn and Asa Mahan among the disput
ence. The first letter relates to the celebration of the Jerry rescue at Syracuse: W. L. Garrison to S. J. May. Boston, Sept. 16, 1852. Ms. In being at your rescue anniversary on the 1st of October, I was hoping to be able to kill two stones with one bird (as some one has said, in Ireland or out of it),—i. e., to make it incidental to my visit to Pennsylvania, to attend the annual meeting of the State A. S. Society; but as that meeting has been postponed from the first week in October to the last, I shall not be able to carry that plan into effect. I am hesitating, therefore, whether to be with you on the 1st. My presence, with the amount of talent you will not fail to have present on the occasion, can certainly be of no special value; and as the distance and the expense are both considerable (the latter being the most weighty consideration), my conclusion is, that I had better send a letter to be read to the meeting, and abandon the idea of being on the ground bodily
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
igginson, Wendell Phillips, Daniel Mann, A Boston dentist residing in Worcester Co., Mass., possessed of much shrewdness of character, and a racy and forcible writer. See the Liberator of this period passim. W. L. Garrison, and F. W. Bird—the editor of Liberator going far beyond the language of it, since Lib. 27.118. it proposed merely an inquiry into the practicability and expediency of disunion, and committed no one signing it to the doctrine. The date of the Convention was fixed in October, and the place selected was Cleveland, Lib. 27.146. Ohio. In that State, the abolitionists had in January petitioned the Legislature to take steps to withdraw from Lib. 27.19. the Union; with the result at least of precipitating a very edifying debate, in which the Republican members Lib. 27.57. solemnly reaffirmed their affection and fidelity to the Union. Rev. T. W. Higginson to W. L. Garrison. Worcester, August 27, 1857. Ms. Mr. Howland Joseph A. Howland of Worcester, a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
een lynched or driven out. The lapse of time had left no excuse for spontaneous heat over such trifles, any more than over a slave-burning like that in Georgia in October, Lib. 30.171. or over the perennial fear of slave risings, such as infected Lib. 29.187, 191. the whole South after Harper's Ferry, and in the summer and autumnLong John is playing thunder with us! Long John has gone over to Douglas! The Higher Power at the helm of affairs paid no attention to such trivialities. The October State elections in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana, following those in New Lib. 30.163, 147. England, clearly foreshadowed the result of the national contest. Ws, the slave has chosen Lib. 30.184. a President of the United States. . . . Lincoln is in place, Garrison in power. The Governor of South Carolina, after the October handwriting on the wall, had called an extra session of Lib. 30.171, 181. the Legislature to provide for a disunion convention in case of Lincoln's election, and